Ella Shohat

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Professor Ella Habiba Shohat (Arabic: إيلا حبيبة شوحط) is Professor of Cultural Studies at New York University, and has taught, lectured and written extensively on issues having to do with Eurocentrism and Orientalism, as well as with postcolonial and transnational approaches to Cultural Studies. More specifically, since the 1980s she has developed critical approaches to the study of Arab Jews/Mizrahim in the context of Israel and Palestine. Born to a Baghdadi family, Ella Habiba Shohat defines herself as an "Arab-Jew".[1]

Her writing has been translated into several languages, including: Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish, and Italian. Shohat has also served on the editorial board of several journals, including: Social Text; Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies; Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism; Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies; and Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication. She is a recipient of such fellowships as Rockefeller and the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, where she also taught at the School of Criticism and Theory. Recently she was awarded a Fulbright research / lectureship at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, for working on the cultural intersections between the Middle East and Latin America.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Race in Translation: Culture Wars around the Postcolonial Atlantic (New York: NYU Press, 2012).
  • Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1989; new edition, London: I.B. Tauris, 2010). Endorsement by Edward W. Said (1989): "Israeli Cinema is a tour-de-force. Not only is it theoretically sophisticated, it is also deeply rooted in the changing politics and perceptions of the Israeli predicament as they bear upon Israeli films. With brilliant humanistic insight, Shohat describes the underlying ideological myths and allegorical structures and contributes significantly to a new, enlarged understanding of the dynamics between Ashkenazi and Sephardic communities, and between them and the Palestinians."
  • Flagging Patriotism: Crises of Narcissism and Anti-Americanism (New York: Routledge, 2006).
  • Le sionisme du point de vue de ses victimes juives: les juifs orientaux en Israel (first published in 1988, with a new introduction, Paris; La Fabrique Editions, 2006).
  • Taboo Memories, Diasporic Voices (Durham: Duke University Press, 2006).
  • Multiculturalism, Postcoloniality, and Transnational Media (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2003).
  • Zikhronot Asurim (Forbidden Reminiscences) (Bimat Kedem LeSifrut Publishing with the Alternative Information Center, Jerusalem, 2001); Arabic translation, Thakariat Mamnu’a, with a preface by Ismail Dabaj (Damascus: Dar Kan’an, 2004); and abridged selected chapters translated into Arabic in As. Safir, Beirut, August 2003; October 24, 2003.
  • Talking Visions: Multicultural Feminism in a Transnational Age (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998).
  • Dangerous Liaisons: Gender, Nation, and Postcolonial Perspectives (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997).
  • Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media (New York: Routledge, 1994).
  • Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation (University of Texas Press, 1989); Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation (University of Texas Press, 1989); Hebrew translation, HaKolnoa haIsraeli: Historia veIdeologia (Israeli Cinema: History and Ideology; Breirot Press, 1991), pp. 1–292; Arabic Translation, Alcinema Alesraeliya, translated from the English by Mahmoud Ali (Cairo: Sawt wa sura, 2000), pp. 1–267; Arabic translation of selected chapters in Adab wa- Naqad (Literature and Criticism) by Ahmad Yusuf: “Muqadama” (Introduction), # 172, December 1999; “Al-Falastiniyun wa-yahud al-sharq” (chapters 1 and 3), # 173, January 2000; “Al-Cinima al-Israiliyya ba’ad 1948” (chapter 2), # 175, March 2000.

Her award-winning publications include: Taboo Memories, Diasporic Voices (Duke University Press, 2006), Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation (University of Texas Press, 1989; New Updated Edition with a new postscript chapter, I.B. Tauris, 2010); Talking Visions: Multicultural Feminism in a Transnational Age (MIT & The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1998); Dangerous Liaisons: Gender, Nation and Postcolonial Perspectives (co-edited, University of Minnesota Press, 1997); and with Robert Stam, Unthinking Eurocentrism (Routledge, 1994); Multiculturalism, Postcoloniality and Transnational Media (Rutgers University Press, 2003); Flagging Patriotism: Crises of Narcissism and Anti-Americanism (Routledge, 2007); and Race in Translation: Culture Wars around the Postcolonial Atlantic (NYU Press, 2012). Shohat’s co-edited volume, Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora (forthcoming, University of Michigan Press, 2013).

Selected Articles

Edited

  • “Edward Said: A Memorial Issue” (co-edited with Patrick Deer & Gyan Prakash), introduction, pp. 1–9, Social Text 87 (Summer 2006), pp. 1–144.
  • “Corruption in Corporate Culture” (co-edited with Randy Martin), introduction, pp. 1–8, Social Text 77 (Winter 2003), pp. 1–153.
  • “Palestine in a Transnational Context” (co-edited with Timothy Mitchell & Gyan Prakash), introduction, pp. 1–6, Social Text 75 (Summer 2003), pp. 1–162.
  • “ 911-A Public Emergency?” (co-edited with Brent Edwards, Stefano Harney, Randy Martin, Timothy Mitchell, Fred Moten), introduction, pp. 1–8, Social Text 72 (Fall 2002), pp. 1–199.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Movement Research: Performance Journal #5 (Fall-Winter 1992), p. 8.