Elmer Ivan Applegate

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Elmer Ivan Applegate
Born March 31, 1867
Ashland, Oregon
Died November 31, 1949(1949-11-31) (aged 82)
Williams, Oregon
Residence Klamath Falls, Oregon
Fields Botany
Institutions US Department of Agriculture
Stanford University
National Park Service
Alma mater Stanford University
Notable awards Honorary degree from Oregon State University
Spouse Esther Emily Ogden (1899)

Elmer Ivan Applegate (March 31, 1867 – November 16, 1949) was an American botanist.

Biography[edit]

Elmer Applegate was born in Ashland, Oregon on March 31, 1867. He started to take botany seriously in 1894, when he started to attend San Jose Normal School, and later, in Stanford University, in 1895. Between 1896 and 1898, he spent 5 months a year, under supervision of Frederick Coville of the US Department of Agriculture, where he did plant surveys in the Cascade Mountains, that can range from Klamath Falls to Portland. During the winter of last year, his job was to organize a plant collections, in Washington DC Between 1928 and 1938 he was appointed as an honorary acting director of the Dudley Herbarium, at Stanford University. When he turned 67, he started serving at National Park Service as a ranger-naturalist, in Crater Lake National Park. That career he was doing from 1934-1939. In 1940, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Oregon State College.[1] He wrote a monograph of Erythronium, from a lily family, a wrote numerous books about flora of the park and Lava Beds National Monument. During his career, he wrote 12 botanical names for plant species.[1]

He married Esther Emily Ogden, in San Bernardino, California, in 1899. She was a niece of Peter Skene Ogden, a Hudson's Bay Company explorer. She was very watercolorist, and painter. She also accompanied her husband on field trips.[1] They both lived in Klamath Falls until his wife died in 1931. He died on November 17, 1949 in Williams, Oregon, at the age of 82.[2]

Memory[edit]

Four plant species were named in his honor.[1]

References[edit]