Embassy Theatre (London)

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This article is about the theatre in London. For other uses, see Embassy Theatre.
Embassy Theatre
Eton Avenue Hall, Hampstead Conservatoire
Embassy Theatre London.jpg
Address 64 Eton Avenue
London
United Kingdom
Coordinates 51°32′39″N 0°10′26″W / 51.5442°N 0.1738°W / 51.5442; -0.1738Coordinates: 51°32′39″N 0°10′26″W / 51.5442°N 0.1738°W / 51.5442; -0.1738
Owner Central School of Speech and Drama
Capacity 234[1]
Construction
Opened 1890
Rebuilt 1928, 1945, 2003
Architect Andrew Mather

The Embassy Theatre is a theatre at 64, Eton Avenue, Swiss Cottage, London.[2]

Early years[edit]

The Embassy Theatre was opened as a repertory company in September 1928 on the initiative of Sybil Arundale and Herbert Jay.,[3] when the premises of Hampstead Conservatoire of Music were adapted by architect Andrew Mather.[4] The following were some of its productions:

From September 1930 to March 1932 the theatre was directed by Alec L. Rea[10] and A. R. Whatmore.[11] Productions included:

Ronald Adam years[edit]

Control than passed to Ronald Adam (also known as Ronald Adams),[4] who remained at the helm until 1939. During that time he made over 150 new productions and revivals, of which over thirty were then transferred to various theatres in the West End.[20] The Embassy school of acting was opened in the theatre in 1932.[21] Some of the more notable productions at the theatre were:

Ronald Adam's own list of significant transfers in that period was Ten Minute Alibi, Close Quarters, The Dominant Sex, Professor Bernhardi, Judgment Day.[20]

Post-war period[edit]

After war damage, the building was reopened in 1945, with a capacity of 678.[21] It was then run until 1954 by Anthony Hawtrey.[22]

In 1953 it was sold to Sidney Bernstein[4] with management by screen-writer and playwright Wolf Mankowitz.

  • The Bespoke Overcoat, 1954
  • The Lion in the Lighthouse, June 1955, with Henry Kendall (actor)
  • The World of Sholem Aleichem, ca. 1955
  • The Boychik, ca. 1956

Central School[edit]

It was sold to the Central School of Speech and Drama in 1956.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Performance Spaces". Royal Central School of Speech & Drama, University of London. Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  2. ^ remotegoat website
  3. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Arundale, Sybil
  4. ^ a b c The Theatres Trust
  5. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: De Casalis, Jeanne
  6. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Hunt, Martita
  7. ^ a b c Who's Who in the Theatre: Parker, Cecil
  8. ^ letter to Peggy Kirkcaldy
  9. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Rawlings, Margaret
  10. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Rea, Alec L.
  11. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Whatmore, A. R.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Who's Who in the Theatre: Van Gyseghem, André
  13. ^ Agatha Christie MysteryNet
  14. ^ Griffith Jones obituary, The Independent
  15. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Shaw, Sebastian
  16. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Donat, Robert
  17. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Lomas, Herbert
  18. ^ Sunday Herald article on rediscovery of Chimneys
  19. ^ a b c George Coulouris at filmreferencce.com
  20. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Adam, Ronald
  21. ^ a b c British History Online: Hampstead Social and Cultural Activities
  22. ^ a b c d e Colin Chambers (editor) (2002). The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre. 
  23. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: de Marney, Derrick
  24. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Howe, George
  25. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Wheatley, Alan
  26. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Douglas, Robert
  27. ^ Robert Douglas obituary, The Independent
  28. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Johnson, Celia
  29. ^ The Glass Wall synopsis and history
  30. ^ chapter by Marie Seton. Paul Robeson: the Great Forerunner. Freedomways. 
  31. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Hawkins, Jack
  32. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Lõhr, Marie
  33. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Chapman, Edward
  34. ^ John Clements at filmreference.com
  35. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Farebrother, Violet
  36. ^ a b Who's Who in the Theatre: Portman, Eric
  37. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Egan, Michael
  38. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Churchill, Diana
  39. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Bird, Richard
  40. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Ray, René
  41. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Browne, Coral
  42. ^ Sydney Morning Herald, July 6 1935
  43. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Homolka, Oscar
  44. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Robson, Flora
  45. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Sofaer, Abraham
  46. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Adrian, Max
  47. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Howlett, Noël
  48. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Johns, Glynis
  49. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Lacey, Catherine
  50. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Woodbridge, George
  51. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Leaver, Philip
  52. ^ Milly S. Barranger (2004). Margaret Webster: A Life in the Theater. University of Michigan Press. 
  53. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Love, Mabel
  54. ^ Alan Strachan, Joseph O'Conor obituary, The Independent, 2 February 2001
  55. ^ The Times obituary Joyce Blair
  56. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Toone, Geoffrey
  57. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Travers, Linden.
  58. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Allen, Jack
  59. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Burden, Hugh
  60. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Ramage, Cecil R.
  61. ^ Kieron Moore obituary, Daily Telegraph
  62. ^ a b c Templeman collection of theatre programmes: Embassy Theatre
  63. ^ Mary Ellis obituary in The Independent
  64. ^ Who's Who in the Theatre: Redgrave, Michael Scudamore
  65. ^ Philip King. On Monday Next. London: Samuel French. 
  66. ^ Robert Eddison at IMDb
  67. ^ Laurence Payne obituary, The Times

General reference[edit]

External links[edit]