Embassy of the United States to the Holy See

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Embassy of the United States to the Holy See
Native name
Latin: Legationis ad Sanctam Sedem Civitatum Foederatarum Americae
Seal of an Embassy of the United States of America.png
Location Via delle Terme Deciane
Italy Rome, Italy
Coordinates 41°54′24″N 12°24′35″E / 41.9068°N 12.4098°E / 41.9068; 12.4098Coordinates: 41°54′24″N 12°24′35″E / 41.9068°N 12.4098°E / 41.9068; 12.4098
Opened 1994; 20 years ago (1994)
Ambassador Ken Hackett (since 2013)
Embassy of the United States to the Holy See is located in Italy
Embassy of the United States to the Holy See
Location of Embassy of the United States to the Holy See in Italy

The Embassy of the United States of America to the Holy See (or Embassy Vatican for short) is the diplomatic mission of United States of America to the Holy See, a term referring to the central government and universal reach of the Roman Catholic Church. The current embassy is located on Aventine Hill in the Villa Domiziana in Rome, Italy, which was built as a private residence in 1953. In 1994, the U.S. government acquired the property as the new chancery for embassy.[1] On August 1, 2013, Ken Hackett was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as the new Ambassador to the Holy See.[2]

The embassy is a part of the "Tri-Mission Community" in Rome, the other two being the Embassy of the United States, Rome and the United States Mission to the U.N. Agencies in Rome.

History[edit]

Formal diplomatic relations with the Holy See were established in 1984 by President Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II. The mission works in partnership with the Holy See on global issues including HIV/AIDS, world hunger, religious freedom, the environment, and human rights.[3]

This facility became the focus of an unexpected controversy when it was falsely reported on November 27, 2013, that the Embassy would be closed.[4] The embassy will instead be transferred in January 2015 to a larger building adjacent to the U.S. Embassy to Italy for reasons of cost, security, and proximity to the Vatican itself.[5] However as part of a broader push to cut security for American embassies, Congress blocked the move in 2014.[6]

External links[edit]

Official website

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Embassy Information". United States Embassy to the Holy See. Retrieved 2013-07-27. 
  2. ^ "Former charity head confirmed as U.S. ambassador to Vatican". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2013-11-29. 
  3. ^ "Policy Issues". United States Embassy to the Holy See. Retrieved 2009-04-07. 
  4. ^ Reilly, Mollie (November 27, 2013). "Jeb Bush Perpetuates Myth That Obama Is Closing The Vatican Embassy". Huffington Post. 
  5. ^ "The right’s logical dilemma over embassy security". MSNBC. November 30, 2013. 
  6. ^ Drum, Kevin (16 January 2014). "The 2014 Spending Bill is Infested With Right-Wing Pet Rocks". www.motherjones.com. Mother Jones and the Foundation for National Progress. Retrieved 17 January 2014.