Emblem of Sri Lanka

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Emblem of Sri Lanka
Emblem of Sri Lanka.svg
Details
Armiger Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
Adopted 1972
Crest A Dharmacakra azure on a bezant
Escutcheon On a circular shield: Maroon, a lion passant Or bearing a Sri Lankan sword Or in its right forepaw; an orle enhanced azure bearing concentrically from the center outwards two annulets argent, the petals of a golden water lily proper, and an annulet Or; a bordure Or
Supporters Golden symbols of the Sun and the Moon; the stalks of rice growing from the vase surrounding the shield
Compartment A traditional grain vase
Other elements An annulet Or passing under the crest and vase surrounding the stalks of rice; a bordure azure surrounding the entire arms

The national emblem of Sri Lanka[1][2] is used by the State of Sri Lanka and the Sri Lankan government in connection with the administration and government of the country. The current emblem has been in use since 1972.

The emblem features a gold lion passant, holding a sword in its right fore paw (the same lion from the flag of Sri Lanka) in the centre on a maroon background surrounded by golden petals of a Blue Lotus the national flower of the country. This is placed on top of a traditional grain vase that sprouts sheaves of rice grains that circle the border reflecting prosperity.

The crest is the Dharmacakra, symbolizing the country's foremost place for Buddhism and just rule. Traditional Sinhalese heraldic symbols for the sun and the moon form the supporters.

History[edit]

Portuguese period in Ceylon[edit]

The Portuguese had a coat of arms for their occupied territory in Sri Lanka, around 1505–1658.

Design
It has an Elephant in the foreground with palm trees around it and high mountains in the background.

Dutch period in Ceylon[edit]

It is not known when the coat of arms for the Dutch occupied territory of Sri Lanka was adopted. The coat of arms is from a manuscript dating from 1717 to 1720.

Design
The arms is very similar to the previous Portuguese one with a modified design. It show the geography of the island with mountains and palm trees, with an elephant and cinnamon bales, and two small shields. The elephant is used because it is an animal used for work on the island and it symbolises strength. In front of the elephant are three bales of cinnamon, used for it was the main export product at the time, and the elephant holds a cinnamon branch in its trunk.[3]

British Ceylon[edit]

Main article: British Ceylon

Before independence, Ceylon used the coat of arms of the United Kingdom as the imperial emblem and a unique shield for the colony.

Design
This contained a Sri Lankan Elephant and Coconut trees and later a stupa.

Dominion of Ceylon[edit]

Main article: Dominion of Ceylon

When Ceylon was granted independence from Britain as a dominion in 1948, the need of a new national emblem arose. A committee was named in order to create a national emblem. According to its recommendation a national emblem was adopted in 1954. The island had been a British Crown Colony since 1802.

Design: The emblem was not strictly in the heraldic tradition, however was granted by the College of Arms in 1954. It was derived from the Royal Banner of the Kandyan Kingdom. It largely reflected the Buddhist traditions of the Sinhalese people. At its center had a disk with a gold lion passant holding a sword (here called the Ceylon lion) in its right fore paw, on a maroon background, was taken from the Royal Banner of the Kandyan Kingdom. Around it were the golden petals of a water lily and topped with the crown ensigning the roundel is called the Ceylon crown; it follows the design of the crown worn by the kings of Kandy. The crown apparently symbolised Queen Elizabeth as Head of State of Ceylon, and it disappeared from the country's arms after change of status to a republic.[4]

Sri Lanka[edit]

The present emblem of was created in 1972 with the ideas and guidance of Nissanka Wijeyeratne.[5] At the time, he was Permanent Secretary to the Ministry of Cultural Affairs and Chairman of the National Emblem and Flag Design Committee. The designer of the emblem was Venerable Mapalagama Wipulasara Maha Thera [6][7] and Art Work by S.M Seneviratne.

Design
The emblem features a gold lion passant, holding a sword in its right fore paw (the same lion from the flag of Sri Lanka) in the centre on a maroon background surrounded by golden petals of a Blue Lotus the national flower of the country. This is placed on top of a traditional grain vase that sprouts sheaves of rice grains that circle the border reflecting prosperity.

The crest is the Dharmacakra, symbolizing the country's foremost place for Buddhism and just rule.[8] Traditional Sinhalese heraldic symbols for the sun and the moon form the supporters.

Historical coats of arms[edit]

Coat of Arms of Sri Lanka Description Dates Used
Sri Lanka.PNG Coat of arms of the Portuguese period in Ceylon. around 1505–1658
Coat of arms Ceylon dutch colony.jpg Coat of arms of the Dutch period in Ceylon. 1602–1796
Coat of arms Ceylon british colony.jpg Arms used in the early stages of British Ceylon.
Arms used in the later stages of British Ceylon. 1875–1948
Coat of arms Ceylon british colony.jpg These arms were used by the Dominion of Ceylon until 1954. 1948–1954
Coat of Arms Ceylon dominion.svg Emblem of the Dominion of Ceylon. 1952–1972

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Emblem, Embassy of Sri Lanka to Japan, retrieved October 28, 2010 
  2. ^ National Emblem, Sri Lankan Consulate in Los Angeles, retrieved October 28, 2010 
  3. ^ "Sri Lanka - Ceylon". Ngw.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  4. ^ "Sri Lanka - Ceylon". Ngw.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  5. ^ Amara Samara in Sinhala. Rivira, Retrieved on 4 January 2009.
  6. ^ (Sinhala) ජනරජ ලාංඡනය නිර්මාණය කළ හැටි. Sunday Lankadeepa, Retrieved on 1 February 2009.
  7. ^ Amara Samara in Sinhala. Rivira, Retrieved on 21 November 2010.
  8. ^ Our national symbols..., Sunday Observer, Sri Lanka's English Newspaper with the largest circulation, retrieved October 28, 2010 

External links[edit]