Embrace (non-profit)

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Embrace
Type Non-profit organization
Industry Health Care
Founded 2008
Headquarters San Francisco, California, United States
Key people
Website www.embraceglobal.org

Embrace is a non profit organization providing low-cost incubators to prevent neonatal deaths in rural areas in developing countries.[1] The organization was developed in 2008 during the multidisciplinary Entrepreneurial Design For Extreme Affordability course at Stanford University by group members Jane Chen, Linus Liang, Rahul Panicker, and Naganand Murty.[2][3]

Incubator[edit]

The Embrace infant warmer is a low-cost solution that maintains premature and low-birth-weight babies’ body temperature. The infant warmer is portable, safe, reusable, and requires only intermittent access to electricity.[4] Each baby warmer is priced at approximately $25.[5][6] The Embrace development team won the fellowship at the Echoing Green competition in 2008 for this concept.[7][8] Embrace also won the 2007-2008 Business Association of Stanford Entrepreneurial Students Social E-Challenge competition grand prize.[citation needed] At a ceremony at BAFTA in London on December 3rd 2013 Jane Chen, Linus Liang, Naganand Murty and Rahul Panicker won an innovation award from the Economist.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Entrepreneurial Design For Extreme Affordability". Stanford Institute of Design. Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  2. ^ "Big Ideas, little packages". National Geographic. 
  3. ^ Lee, Ellen (2010-11-12). "Embrace may keep babies warm - and alive". SFGate. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  4. ^ Sibley, Lisa (2008-04-18). "Stanford startup's $25 'sleeping bag' could save newborns". Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  5. ^ Kannani, Rahim (2010-05-26). "Investing in Women and Girls: A Focus on Health, Advocacy and Innovation". Huffington Post. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  6. ^ Moore, Thomas. "Low tech body warmer is a baby life saver". Sky News. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "ThinkChange India: Extreme Affordability". 2008-09-04. Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  8. ^ "Jane Chen and Rahul Panicker". Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  9. ^ "Technology Quarterly Q4 2013: And the winners are". The Economist. 2013-11-30. Retrieved 2013-12-02. 

External links[edit]