Emergency service response codes

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The emergency services in various countries use systems of response codes to categorize their responses to reported events. One of the best known is the Code 3 Response, which is used in several countries, particularly the United States, to describe a mode of response for an emergency vehicle responding to a call. It is commonly used to mean "use lights and siren."

Use of "Code 3"[edit]

Although the exact origin of Code 3 is not clearly known,[1] its use has spread across the United States and into parts of Canada.[2]

Code 3 was the title to a 1950s television police procedural intended to compete with Dragnet.

The Greaseman used the term in one of his songs, "I Love To Go Code 3".

Response codes[edit]

The most commonly used response codes are:

  • CODE 1: Non-emergency response. No lights or siren, following the flow of traffic.
  • CODE 2: Non-life-threatening emergency response. No use of emergency lights or siren. Must follow all traffic laws.
  • CODE 3: Life-threat response. Emergency traffic, or simultaneous use of lights and siren required in order to achieve a rapid response. This does allow the responding unit to ignore jurisdictional traffic laws, but does not allow the responding unit to operate without due regard to safety.
  • CODE 4: All clear or I am okay. Also used to tell another unit they can disregard.
  • CODE 5: Area under surveillance. All marked units stay out of area.
  • CODE 6: Calling for a cover unit(s).
  • CODE 7: Lunch break or Vehicle repair
  • CODE 8: Confidential information.
  • CODE 9: All non-emergency traffic stay off the radio. A beep transmits over the air every couple of seconds.
  • CODE 0: Big emergency. All units in the area respond code 3 to the units' location.
  • Caution Alpha: Possibly armed
  • Caution Mike: Mentally unstable
  • Caution Victor: Violent

Alternative terminology[edit]

In some agencies, Code 3 is also called a Hot Response. Code 1 is also called a Cold Response.[3]

Some slang may be used, such as "Running Hot", or "Running Cold".

Some departments may use the terms upgrade, and downgrade as well. If a unit is responding to a call without lights or sirens (code 1), and the unit later needs to turn on lights and sirens (code 3), the term upgrade may be used. The term downgrade may be used in the opposite situation.

Some Paramedic/EMS agencies use Priority terms, which run in the opposite of code responses.

  • Priority 0 - D.O.A.
  • Priority 1 - Critical
  • Priority 2 - Emergency
  • Priority 3 - Non-Emergency

Other countries[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

The use of lights and sirens is up to the individual police officer driving to the call. The nature of the call is an aggravating factor when deciding when to use them. Calls are graded by either the control room direct (in the case of emergency calls) or by some sort of first contact centre (nonemergency calls). Grading is effected by such factors as the use or threat of violence at the incident being reported. Even though the grading is done by the control room, officers can request an incident be upgraded if they feel in their judgement they are needed immediately. They can also request to downgrade an incident if they feel they cannot justify using emergency warning equipment to get there. If a control room does not grade a call an emergency and refuse to upgrade it, the police responding to the call can still use emergency equipment if they deem it appropriate.

There is no nationally agreed call grading system with a number of different systems being used across the UK. Some of these are listed below.

Grade Meaning Audible and visible emergency equipment Target time
A Immediate response call Use advisable 8 minutes
B Significant call, routine call Can be used if driver thinks police are needed immediately 20 minutes
C extended call, Scheduled appointments Not to be used No time limit

Another variant in use within the UK.

Grade Meaning Audible and visible emergency equipment
IM Immediate Priority Normally used, examples of incidents graded as an immediate priority include incidents in which life is at risk, there is serious injury (or risk of), serious road traffic collisions, and where serious crime is in-progress or has just taken place.
H High Priority Normally used - incidents graded high are of serious nature and have the potential to develop into immediate priority incidents
N Normal Priority Not used - incidents are graded as normal that do not depend upon a timely police response.
L Low Priority Not used - incidents graded as low that do not depend upon a timely police response and may be resolved by phone or pre-arranged appointment.
NA Non-attendance Not used, no police attendance required.

A numerical grading system is used in some forces.[4]

Grade Meaning Audible and visible emergency equipment
1 Emergency response Road traffic exemptions usually utilised as is audible and visual warning equipment.
2 Urgent response Road traffic exemptions may be utilised along with audible and visual warning equipment.
3 Non-urgent response Audible and visual warning equipment is not used.
4 Appointments Audible and visual warning equipment is not used.
5 For information only Calls not usually requiring police attendance that may be logged for information only.

Australia[edit]

Victoria[edit]

Ambulance Victoria The information provided to Ambulance Victoria at the time of the triple zero call generates a case type and ambulance response code depending on the severity of the emergency.

There are three types of ambulance response:

Code 1: A time critical case with a lights and sirens ambulance response. An example is a cardiac arrest or serious traffic accident.

Code 2: An acute but non-time critical response. The ambulance does not use lights and sirens to respond. An example of this response code is a broken leg.

Code 3: A non-urgent routine case. These include cases such as a person with ongoing back pain but no recent injury.

Source: http://www.ambulance.vic.gov.au/About-Us/How-we-work/In-a-Medical-Emergency/Response-Codes.html

Please note additional codes are used, but these are for internal purposes.

Country Fire Authority There are two types of response for the Country Fire Authority which cover the outer Melbourne Area. These are similar to those used by Ambulance Victoria, minus the use of Code 2.

Code 1: A time critical event with response requiring lights and siren. This usually is a known and going fire or a rescue incident.

Code 2: Unused within the Country Fire Authority

Code 3: Non-urgent event, such as a previously extinguished fire or community service cases (such as animal rescue or changing of smoke alarm batteries for the elderly).

New South Wales[edit]

Marine Rescue NSW

Code 1 Urgent Response - Use warning devices

Code 2 Semi Urgent Response - Use of Warning devices at skippers discretion

Code 3 Non Urgent Response - Warning Devices not needed

Code 4 Training - No Warning devices to be used unless specifically needed for training


'N.S.W. AMBULANCE CODES'

ZERO 1 Clear the air, Urgent Message.

CODE 1 Officer in trouble requires Police.

CODE 2 Cardiac arrest.

CODE 3 Advise Hosp. of patients condition.

CODE 4 Patient Deceased.

CODE 5 Arriving at Hospital, DOA for Cert.

CODE 6 Departing Hospital for Morgue.

CODE 7 Arriving at Morgue.

CODE 8 Patient with a Terminal condition.

CODE 9 Rescue required, Person trapped.

CODE 10 Fire Brigade required.

CODE 11 Live Wires Down contact Power Auth.

CODE 12 Poisonous Gas.

CODE 13 Danger of Explosion.

CODE 14 Ambulance involved in Collision.

CODE 15 Patients or Officer Injured.

CODE 16 Tow Truck required.

CODE 17 Overdose.

CODE 18 Airport Alert.

CODE 19 Disaster Alert.

CODE 20 Meal Break.

CODE 21 Paramedics required.

CODE 22 Morphine administered.

CODE 23 Infectious disease.

CODE 24 Approach with caution, await Police.

CODE 25 Suicide / Suspicious death call Police.

CODE 26 Sexual Assault

Fire and Rescue NSW use the following radio codes:

  • Code 1: Responding to Incident
  • Code 2: Called Off Incident (No Longer Required to Respond)
  • Code 3: On Scene at Incident
  • Code 4: Available for Response
  • Code 5: Returned to Station
  • Code 6: Entered Rural Fire Service Area
  • Code 7: Unavailable to Respond (Reason Required)

The New South Wales Rural Fire Service uses two levels of response, depending on what the call-out is and what has been directed of the crew attending the incident by orders of the duty officer:

  • Proceed: To drive to an incident, without displaying lights and/or sirens and to obey all road rules.
  • Respond: To drive to an incident, urgently but safely, whilst displaying lights and/or sirens. Some exemptions exist for emergency drivers (for example: proceeding through a red light after stopping and when safe) though all road rules still must be obeyed. The siren can be switched off at the discretion of the driver when it is not needed (for example, when the road ahead is clear of traffic and easily visible) and reactivated at possible traffic hazards.

The New South Wales Police Force uses two distinct classifications for responding to incidents. In order to respond 'code red' a driver must be suitably trained and have qualified in appropriate police driver training courses.[5]

  • Code Red: Vehicle responding with lights and sirens activated.
  • Code Blue: Vehicle responding without lights or sirens activated.

South Australia[edit]

SA Ambulance Service use a Priority system.

Priority Case Type Lights & Sirens Used Crew Type
1 Emergency Yes Emergency (Paramedic or Intensive Care Paramedic)
2 Emergency Yes Emergency (Paramedic or Intensive Care Paramedic)
4 Urgent No Emergency (Paramedic or Intensive Care Paramedic)
5 Urgent No Emergency Support Service (Ambulance Officer)
6 Routine No Emergency (Paramedic or Intensive Care Paramedic)
7 Routine No Emergency Support Service (Ambulance Officer)
8 Routine No Patient Transport Service (Ambulance Officer)

Note: Priorities 0 and 3 have been reserved for future use. Priority 9 is used for administration taskings.

The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service, Country Fire Service and South Australian State Emergency Service use a Priority System which has been recently updated.

Priority Type Local Event Triage Lights & Sirens Used Response
1 Emergency Can't wait Yes Multiple Units Sent, Life-Threat
2 Urgent Can Wait No Single Unit Responded, Potential for Life-Threat
3 Routine Will Wait No Used Primarily by SES[disambiguation needed], No risk of Life Threat

All calls are routed through the Metropolitan Fire Service (Call Sign "Adelaide Fire") including State Emergency Service 132 500 calls.

During significant weather events the State Communication Centre (SCC) unit of the SES take over call taking responsibly. This operations centre is manned by volunteers routing calls for assistance to the closest unit who will dispatch the events to individual teams.

Queensland[edit]

Queensland Police uses the priority system;
Code 1 - Immediate risk of death to a person. Proceed lights and sirens. Permission granted to disobey road rules.
Code 2 - Immediate risk of serious injury to a person or damage to property. Proceed lights and sirens. Permission granted to disobey road rules.
Code 3 - Routine job. Proceed without lights or siren. Road rules must be obeyed.
Code 4 - Negotiated response time. Proceed without lights or siren. Road rules must be obeyed.

For Queensland Police code 1 and code 2 are exactly the same response time. Rarely will a job be given a priority code 1, instead officers will be told to respond code 2.

Northern Territory[edit]

St John Ambulance Northern Territory uses terms to determine the response.[6]

Emergency or Non-Emergency. Emergency can be broken down into Life-threatening or Non-life-threatening.
Emergency: Life-threatening - Respond lights and sirens
Emergency:Non-life-threatening - Respond without lights and sirens
Non Emergency: Respond without lights and sirens

Western Australia[edit]

St John Ambulance Western Australia uses the following codes to determine a response.[7]

Priority 1 represents an Emergency call. (Response time target is to attend to 90% of emergency calls within 15 minutes)
Priority 2 represents an Urgent call. (Response time target is to attend to 90% of urgent calls within 25 minutes)
Priority 3 represents a Non-urgent call. (response time target is to attend to 90% of non-urgent calls within 60 minutes) ..

Possible shift to plain language[edit]

In the U.S. the National Incident Management System (NIMS) states "it is required that plain language be used for multi-agency, multi-jurisdiction and multi-discipline events, such as major disasters and exercises" and federal grants became contingent on this beginning fiscal year 2006.[8] NIMS also strongly encourages the use of plain language for internal use within a single agency.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starting 1971 Norfolk Police Department, implemented response codes. Code 1 was red lights and siren, Code 2 was red light only, and Code 3 was normal running, no lights or siren. This is still in effect today, with the only change from red lights to blue lights. These response codes are used by Norfolk Police, Fire and EMS units. Richard Herzing
    Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response
    Public Safety Communications
    Norfolk, Virginia
  2. ^ Areas using Code 3:
    Phoenix (AZ) Regional SOP 205.08 [1],
    Sierra-Sacramento Valley EMS Agency Program Policy reference no. 415 [2],
    Hennepin County (MN) EMS Ordinance #09 [3],
    Hawaii Police Department General Order 807 [4],
    The San Diego (CA) Paramedics [5],
    Killeen (TX) Police Jargon [6]
  3. ^ Sources:
    San Francisco (CA) EMS Agency 0905 Policy Manual [7],
    Saratoga (NY) EMS Dispatch Changes [8],
    Amherst (NY) Annual 2005 Memo [9],
    Middletown (CT) EMD [10].
  4. ^ http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/11/1397/4
  5. ^ http://ten.com.au/recruits-the-police.htm
  6. ^ http://www.stjohnnt.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=94&Itemid=262
  7. ^ https://www.ambulance.net.au/content.asp?id=166
  8. ^ NIMS Integration Center. [http://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nims/plain_lang.pdf (2006). "NIMS AND USE OF PLAIN LANGUAGE". Accessed 14 May 2008.