Emily Howard

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For the Little Britain character, see Emily Howard (Little Britain).

Emily Howard (born 1979) is a British composer from Liverpool.

As a child, Howard learned to play chess (British Junior Girls Chess Champion for 6 years (1990 U11, 1991 U12,1992 U16, 1993 U14, 1994 U15/U16, 1996 U18) and the cello, whilst also writing compositions for local ensembles and orchestras. After completing a degree in mathematics and computation at Lincoln College, Oxford, Howard studied composition at the Royal Northern College of Music. She holds a doctorate in composition from the University of Manchester.[1][2]

Selected works[edit]

  • Hope for tenor and piano, 2002
  • Passacaglia for string orchestra, 2002
  • Dualities for large ensemble, 2005
  • Sky and Water for solo piano, 2005
  • Cloud Chamber for clarinet and piano, 2006
  • Deep Soul Diving for wind orchestra, 2006
  • Ite Fortes for solo violin and chamber choir, 2006
  • Lachrymose for chamber orchestra, 2006
  • Lachrimae Antiquae Novae for large symphony orchestra, 2007
  • Magnetite for symphony orchestra, 2007[2]
  • The Summoning of Mephisto for chamber ensemble and film, 2007
  • Wild Clematis in Winter for mezzo-soprano and piano, 2008
  • Broken Hierarchies II for piano trio, 2009
  • Masquerade for basset clarinet and piano, 2009
  • Symphony:Magnetite for symphony orchestra, 2009
  • Settle for mixed ensemble and film, 2009–10
  • Simple Remains for mixed ensemble and film, 2010
  • Solar for large symphony orchestra, 2010
  • Songs from Dickens for mezzo-soprano, speaker and piano trio, 2010
  • Broken Hierarchies for cello ensemble, 2008
  • Prayer for wind orchestra, 2010
  • Obsidian for brass band, 2010
  • Ada Sketches II for mezzo-soprano, 2011
  • Mesmerism piano concerto, 2011 (commission and first performance by the Liverpool Mozart Orchestra)
  • Calculus Of The Nervous System for symphony orchestra, 2011 (Wien Modern 2011 Festival Commission)[3][2]
(Ada Sketches, Mesmerism and Calculus of the Nervous System form The Lovelace Trilogy, linked by Howard's interest in mathematician Ada Lovelace)[2][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Interview, Financial Times (UK edition) Oct. 1–2, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Emily Howard: Lecturer in Composition". Royal Northern College of Music. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Youngs, Ian (15 June 2012). "London 2012: Opera recalls Olympic hero Emil Zatopek". BBC News. 
  4. ^ a b Battle, Laura (30 September 2011). "Calculated compositions". Financial Times. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  5. ^ Hickling, Alfred (18 June 2012). "Zátopek! – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  6. ^ Beale, Robert (4 November 2013). "Review: BBC Philharmonic @ Bridgewater Hall". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Petri-Preis, Axel. Emily Howard's Lovelace Trilogy: A Musical Homage to a Mathematical Pioneer, Tempo, Vol.67, Issue No.265 (July 2013) (Cambridge University Press 2013).

External links[edit]