Emily Sartain

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Sartain in 1876

Emily Sartain (1841–1927) was the first woman to practice the art of the mezzotint and the only woman to win a gold medal at the 1876 World Fair in Philadelphia. She was the daughter of Philadelphia master printer and publisher of Sartain's Magazine John Sartain.[1]

In 1886 she became the principal of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women, now Moore College of Art & Design.[1] She continued in the role for 33 years (1886–1919). As principal at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women she achieved national recognition in the new field of professional art education. Today, Moore offers both a BFA and MA in Art Education. She was also responsible for introducing important faculty members such as Robert Henri, Samuel Murray and Daniel Garber.[2]

A portrait painter and engraver, Emily Sartain studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and later travelled with friend Mary Cassatt to study painting in Europe. It was at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts that she met and was romantically linked to Thomas Eakins,[3] who remained a lifelong friend.[1]

In 1897, Emily Sartain was a founding member of The Plastic Club in Philadelphia.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Hoffmann, Mott, Sharon, Amanda (2008). Moore College of Art & Design. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-5659-9. 
  2. ^ de Angeli Walls, Nina (2001). Art, Industry, and Women's Education in Philadelphia. Bergin & Garvey. ISBN 0-89789-745-5. 
  3. ^ Ricci, Patricia Likos (2000). "Bella, Cara Emilia: The Italianate Romance of Emily Sartain and Thomas Eakins", in Philadelphia's Cultural Landscape: The Sartain Family Legacy, ed. Katherine Martinez and Page Talbott,. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. pp. 120–137. ISBN 978-1566397919. 
  • Hoffmann, Mott, Sharon, Amanda (2008). Moore College of Art & Design. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-5659-9. 
  • de Angeli Walls, Nina (2001). Art, Industry, and Women's Education in Philadelphia. Bergin & Garvey. ISBN 0-89789-745-5. 
  • Ricci, Patricia Likos (2000). "Bella, Cara Emilia: The Italianate Romance of Emily Sartain and Thomas Eakins", Philadelphia’s Cultural Landscape: The Sartain Family Legacy: 1830-1930, ed. Katherine Martinez and Page Talbott, (Philadelphia: Temple University Press)120-137. ISBN 978-1566397919.