Emotions (Brenda Lee song)

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"Emotions"
Single by Brenda Lee
from the album Emotions
B-side "I'm Learning About Love"
Released December 1960
Recorded August 16, 1960
Genre traditional pop
Length 2:47
Label Decca Records 31195
Writer(s) Ramsey Kearney, Mel Tillis
Producer(s) Owen Bradley
Brenda Lee singles chronology
"I Want to Be Wanted"
(1960)
"Emotions"
(1960)
"You Can Depend on Me"
(1961)

"Emotions" is a song written by Ramsey Kearney and Mel Tillis which became a Top Ten hit for Brenda Lee in 1961.

The original version of "Emotions" was a solo composition by Ramsey Kearney: in 1957 Kearney recorded a demo of the song with which he approached the Nashville music publishers where Mel Tillis was a staff writer. Tillis would recall: "I really liked the song and I told him...'You know, I think that I can get the song recorded by Carl Smith.'" Carl Smith did indeed record the song with the track serving as B-side to his #2 C&W hit "Why, Why".[1]

In the summer of 1960 Tillis amended the lyrics to Kearney's original lyric for "Emotions" and successfully pitched the song for Brenda Lee to record.[1] Lee recorded "Emotions" in an August 16, 1960 session at Bradley Film & Recording Studio in Nashville, TN: the session - produced and arranged by Owen Bradley and featuring Floyd Cramer on piano - also produced Lee's #1 hit "I Want to Be Wanted" which was the precedent single to "Emotions". With the B-side "I'm Learning About Love" - recorded with the same personnel at an August 19, 1960 session at Bradley Film & Recording Studio - "Emotions" was issued as a single in December 1960 and rose to a #7 peak in February 1961. "I'm Learning About Love" also became a Top 40 hit for Lee peaking at #33.

A major hit in Australia (#20) and Flemish Belgium (#6), "Emotions" also afforded Lee a lower chart item in France (#56), Germany (#47), and the UK (#45).

An Emotions album by Brenda Lee - featuring both the title cut and "I'm Learning About Love" - was issued April 3, 1961.

Other versions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cooper, Daniel. "You Could Be Rich: one man’s adventure in the song-poem trade". NashvilleScene.com. Retrieved June 26, 2014.