Empress Xiaoshencheng

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Empress Xiaoshencheng
Empress of the Qing Dynasty
Tenure 1822–1833
Predecessor Empress Xiaoherui
Successor Empress Xiaoquancheng
Spouse Daoguang Emperor
Issue State Princess Duanmin
Posthumous name
孝慎敏肅哲順和懿誠惠敦恪熙天詒聖成皇后
Dynasty Aisin Gioro
Father Tunggiya Shuminge (佟佳舒明阿)
Died 1833
Forbidden City, Beijing, China
Burial Western Qing Tombs, China
Empress Xiaoshencheng
Chinese name
Chinese 孝慎成皇后
Lady Tunggiya
Chinese 佟佳氏
Manchu name
Manchu script ᡥᡳᠶᠣᠣᡧᡠᠩᡤᠠ ᠣᠯᡥᠣᠪᠠ ᡧᠠᠩᡤᠠᠨ ᡥᡡᠸᠠᠩᡥᡝᠣ
Romanization hiyoošungga olhoba šanggan hūwangheo

Empress Xiaoshencheng (died 16 June 1833) was an Empress Consort of the Daoguang Emperor of the Qing Dynasty.

Biography[edit]

Empress Xiaoshencheng was born in the Manchu Tunggiya clan. Her personal name is unknown. She was the daughter of Shuminge (舒明阿), Duke of the Third Class (三等承恩公), who was a descendant of Tongtulai (佟圖賴), the maternal grandfather of the Kangxi Emperor. Her family was under the Bordered Yellow Banner of the Eight Banners.[1] Lady Tunggiya's birth date was not recorded in history. She was first mentioned only after the death of the Daoguang Emperor's first consort. In 1808 she was selected as a potential candidate to be a concubine of Mianning (who would become the Daoguang Emperor). She gave birth to a daughter in 1813.

In 1820 Mianning succeeded the Jiaqing Emperor to the throne as the Daoguang Emperor. A year later Daoguang granted Lady Tunggiya's brother Yukuan (裕寬) the title of Marquis of the First Class (一等承恩侯). When the mourning period for the late Jiaqing Emperor had ended, Lady Tunggiya was instated as Empress Consort in 1822. As empress she was in charge of the Daoguang Emperor's concubines. She died in the 13th year of the reign of the Daoguang Emperor, and was interred in the Muling Mausoleum at the Western Qing Tombs.

Remaining Portraits of the Empress[edit]

Children[edit]

  • State Princess Duanmin (端憫固倫公主; 1813–1819), the eldest daughter of the Daoguang Emperor. She was posthumously granted her title in 1820.

Posthumous title[edit]

Empress Xiaoshencheng's full posthumous title is:

  • Empress Xiaoshenminsuzheshunheyichenghuidunkexitianyishengcheng
    (孝慎敏肅哲順和懿誠惠敦恪熙天詒聖成皇后)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The draft history of the Qing Dynasty 《清史稿 卷一百六十七 表七》 states that her family belonged to this banner.

References[edit]

  • Draft history of the Qing dynasty, Consort files. 《清史稿》卷二百十四.列傳一.后妃傳.宣宗孝慎成皇后.
  • Daily Life in the Forbidden City, Wan Yi, Wang Shuqing, Lu Yanzhen ISBN 0-670-81164-5.
  • Betty Peh-Tʻi Wei, (2006) "Ruan Yuan, 1764-1849: the life and work of a major scholar-official in nineteenth-century China before the Opium War". ISBN 962-209-785-5, published by: Hong Kong University Press. Page.272.
  • http://www.royalark.net/China/manchu12.htm, about the Aisin Gioro familytree.

Succession[edit]

Empress Xiaoshencheng
House of Aisin-Gioro (1636–1912)
Died: 1833
Chinese royalty
Preceded by
Empress Xiaomucheng
Empress Xiaoherui (actual predecessor)
Empress of China
1822–1833
Succeeded by
Empress Xiaoquancheng