EnCase

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EnCase
EnCase Forensic Logo
Blank EnCase project file
Blank EnCase (V6.16.1) project file
Developer(s) Guidance Software
Stable release 7.09.02 / February 4, 2014; 5 months ago (2014-02-04)
Development status Active
Operating system Windows
Available in English
Type Computer forensics
Website www.guidancesoftware.com

EnCase is a suite of digital forensics products by Guidance Software. The software comes in several forms designed for forensic, cyber security and e-discovery use. The company also offers EnCase training and certification.

Data recovered by EnCase has been used successfully in various court systems around the world, such as in the cases of the BTK Killer and the murder of Danielle van Dam.[1][2][3]

EnCase Product Line[edit]

EnCase technology is available within a number of products, currently including: EnCase Forensic, EnCase Cybersecurity, EnCase eDiscovery, and EnCase Portable.[4] Guidance Software also runs training courses and certification, over 50,000 individuals have completed the training to date.[5]

Features[edit]

EnCase contains tools for several areas of the digital forensic process; acquisition, analysis and reporting. The software also includes a scripting facility called EnScript with various API's for interacting with evidence.

EnCase Evidence File Format[edit]

EnCase contains functionality to create forensic images of suspect media. Images are stored in proprietary EnCase Evidence File Format; the compressible file format is prefixed with case data information and consists of a bit-by-bit (i.e. exact) copy of the media inter-spaced with CRC hashes for every 64K of data. The file format also appends an MD5 hash of the entire drive as a footer.[6]

Mobile forensics[edit]

As of EnCase V7, Mobile Phone Analysis is possible with the addition some add-ons available from Guidance Software.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Taub, Eric A. (2006-04-05). "Deleting may be easy, but your hard drive still tells all". New York Times. Retrieved 2009-01-11. 
  2. ^ Stevenson, C. "Rush to Judgement", CreateSpace, June 22, 2011, pages 628-636.
  3. ^ Dillon, Jeff, and Steve Perez. "Prosecutor hammers away at computer forensic expert; Dad's patron describes Brenda's propositions," San Diego Union-Tribune, July 3, 2002.
  4. ^ url=http://www.guidancesoftware.com/"| 11 October 2012
  5. ^ url="http://itbriefing.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=328379" | 11 October 2012
  6. ^ Martin S. Olivier, Sujeet Shenoi, ed. (2006). Advances in digital forensics II. Springer. ISBN 0-387-36890-6. Retrieved 31 August 2010. 
  7. ^ GuidanceSoftware. "EnCase Forensic V7". GuidanceSoftware. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]