Selena singles discography

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Selena singles discography
Releases
Singles 15
Promotional singles 13
Other charted songs 3
Soundtrack singles 3
Charity record 1
Other appearances 9

The singles discography of American recording artist Selena consists of 15 singles, 13 promotional singles, three soundtrack singles, three other charted songs, one charity record, and nine other appearances. In 1989, Selena released her self-titled debut album, under EMI Latin. Three singles were released, "Contigo Quiero Estar", "Mentiras", and "Sukiyaki". The latter peaked at number eight on the US Hot Latin Tracks chart, becoming Selena's first charting single, while the former was a cover song by Japanese crooner Kyu Sakamoto. "Buenos Amigos", a duet with Salvadoran recording artist Álvaro Torres, peaked at number one on the Hot Latin Tracks chart, giving Selena her first number one single. "Baila Esta Cumbia", the lead single from Ven Conmigo (1990) peaked within the top ten on the Latin Regional Digital Songs chart. Ven Conmigo yielded two other singles, "Ya Ves" and "La Tracalera", the latter peaked at number 20 on the Latin Regional Digital Songs chart. In 1992, Selena released her third studio album, Entre a Mi Mundo, which spawned four singles, "La Carcacha", "¿Qué Creías?" and "Amame" which attained the top 30 positions on the Latin charts, while "Como La Flor" became Selena's signature song as well as being one of her most popular songs after it peaked at number six on the Hot Latin Tracks.[1][2]

Selena Live! (1993) produced two top five singles; "No Debes Jugar" and "La Llamada". Selena's collaboration with nuyorican band Barrio Boyzz on their 1994 single "Donde Quiera Que Estes" sold over 100,000 copies in the United States alone. "Amor Prohibido", the debut single from the album of the same name, was released in 1994, sold 500,000 units in the United States. The recording was nominated for a Grammy Award,[3][4][5] and it and "No Me Queda Más", became the most successful singles on the Hot Latin Tracks chart in 1994 and 1995, respectively.[6][7] "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" became Selena's third consecutive number one single for Amor Prohibido, and became one of Selena's most famous recording and fan favorite among her Mexican fans.[8][9] On March 31, 1995, Selena was murdered by Yolanda Saldivar, her friend and ex-employer for her boutiques.[10] At the time of her death, "Fotos y Recuerdos", was positioned at number four on the Hot Latin Tracks, and the week following her death, peaked at number one posthumously.[11] Amor Prohibido yielded another succeeding US number one single posthumously; "Techno Cumbia", which helped Selena to become the first female Hispanic singer to have five number one singles1 from a single Spanish-language album.[12][13]

In July 1995, the crossover album Selena was working on at the time of her death, Dreaming of You was released posthumously unfinished.[14] "I Could Fall in Love" and "Tú Sólo Tú" served as lead promotional singles, peaked at number one and two on the Hot Latin Tracks chart, respectively for five consecutive weeks.[15] The latter became the highest ranking English language single to appear on that chart for two consecutive years,[16] while it proved commercially successful by peaking at number eight on the US Hot 100 Airplay chart. The title track sold 254,000 digital units in the United States, peaked at number 21 on the Hot 100 and became Selena's most popular and most recognized recording.[17] "I'm Getting Used to You" peaked at number one on the Hot Dance Singles Sales, while "El Toro Relajo" reached number 14 on the Latin Regional Mexican Airplay chart. The remix version of "Missing My Baby", found on Dreaming of You, peaked at number 22 on the Rhythmic Top 40 chart. Three singles were released from Selena's first remix album, Siempre Selena (1996). The album's lead single, "Siempre Hace Frio", performed well in the US by peaking at number two on the Latin charts. The second single, "No Quiero Saber", was moderately successful, peaking at number six on the Hot Latin Tracks. While "Costumbres", a cover by Mexican singer-songwriter Juan Gabriel, peaked within the top fifteen on the Latin charts.

Selena's charity effort, "A Boy Like That" from the musical West Side Story, which was recorded to help raise funds for AIDS patients,[18] peaked at number four on the Hot Dance Club Songs chart. In 1997, the Selena soundtrack album to the film of the same name, produced three promotional singles; "Where Did the Feeling Go?", "Is It the Beat?", and the "Disco Medley". The former peaked within the top twenty in the US, while the others failed to chart. "Con Tanto Amor Medley" was released from Ones in 2002, it also failed to impact any music chart. Selena's last known recorded song, "Puede Ser", which is a duet with Puerto Rican/Dominican singer Nando "Guero" Dominguez,[19] was released on the album Momentos Intimos (2004). A year later, Selena's brother A.B. Quintanilla III's band Kumbia Kings recorded "Baila Esta Kumbia", which is a remix sampled version of Selena's "Baila Esta Cumbia"; it peaked at number 16 on the Regional Mexican Airplay chart.[20] In 2006, "Dame Tu Amor", reached number 31 on the Hot Ringtones chart. In February 2012, the duet version of "Amor Prohibido" was released digitally on iTunes, serving as lead single for Enamorada de Ti (2012). The duet version peaked at number eight on the Latin Pop Airplay, while other songs on the album including the title track, "Como La Flor" (duet with Christian Castro), "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" (duet with Selena Gomez), and "Fotos y Recuerdos" (duet with Don Omar) have all charted on various Billboard digital charts, the first since their official release. Selena was named the "Top Latin artist of the '90s", and the "Best selling Latin artist of the decade" by Billboard magazine for her fourteen top 10 singles in the Hot Latin Songs chart, including seven number one songs.[21] At the 2011 Mexican Billboard Music Awards, Selena was awarded "Digital Download Artist of the Year".[22]

Singles[edit]

List of albums, with selected chart positions, sales and certifications
Title Year Peak chart positions Sales Album
US
[23]
US Adult
[24]
US Mex Digital
[25]
US Latin Tracks
[26]
US Regional
[27]
US Latin Pop
[28]
"Contigo Quiero Estar" 1989 8 Selena
"Sukiyaki"
"Mentiras"
"Baila Esta Cumbia" 1990 13 Ven Conmigo
"La Carcacha" 1992 6 Entre a Mi Mundo
"Como La Flor" 2 6 9
"¿Qué Creias?" 1993 14 16
"No Debes Jugar" 13 3 Selena Live!
"Amor Prohibido" 1994 17 1 5 1
  • US: 500,0002
Amor Prohibido
"No Me Queda Más" 1 1 13
"Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" 1 1 4 11
"Dreaming of You" 1995 22 33 11 9
  • US: 254,0003
Dreaming of You
"Techno Cumbia" 1 1 13
"Siempre Hace Frio" 1996 2 2 Siempre Selena
"No Quiero Saber" 6 15 10
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Promotional singles[edit]

List of singles, with selected chart positions
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US
4
US Adult
[24]
US Club
[29]
US Mex Digital
[25]
US Latin Tracks
[26]
US Regional
[27]
US Latin Pop
[28]
"Ya Ves" 1990 20 Ven Conmigo
"La Tracalera"
"Amame" 1992 27 21 Entre a mi mundo
"La Llamada" 1993 10 5 Selena Live!
"Fotos y Recuerdos" 1995 1 1 12 Amor Prohibido
"Si Una Vez" 4
"El Chico del Apartamento 512" 5
"I Could Fall in Love" 17 2 5 1 Dreaming of You
"Tú Sólo Tú" 1 1
"I'm Getting Used to You" 107 23 1
"El Toro Relajo 24 14
"Costumbres" 1996 15 13 Siempre Selena
"Con Tanto Amor Medley" 2002 Ones
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Soundtrack songs[edit]

List of albums, with selected chart positions, sales and certifications
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US Latin
[26]
US Latin Pop
[28]
"Disco Medley" 1997 25 8 Selena: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
"Is It the Beat?"
"Where Did the Feeling Go?"
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Charity records[edit]

List of singles, with selected chart positions
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US Dance
[30]
US Latin
[26]
"A Boy Like That" 1997 4 Selena: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Other charted songs[edit]

List of singles, with selected chart positions
Title Year5 Peak chart positions Album
US Ringtones
[31]
US Rhythmic
[32]
US Mex Digital
[25]
"Dame Tu Amor" 2006 31 Alpha
"Enamorada de Ti" 2012 17 Enamorada de Ti
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

As featured artist[edit]

List of singles, with selected chart positions
Title Year Peak chart positions Sales Album
US Latin Tracks
[26]
US Regional
[27]
US Latin Pop
[28]
US Mex Digital
[25]
"Buenos Amigos"
(duet with Álvaro Torres)
1991 1 Nada Se Compara Contigo
"Donde Quiera Que Estés"
(duet with the Barrio Boyzz)
1994 1 1
  • US: 100,0006
Donde Quiera Que Estes
"God's Child (Baila Conmigo)"
(duet with David Byrne)
1995 Dreaming of You
"Puede Ser"
(duet with Nando "Guero" Dominguez)
2004 Momentos Intimos
"Baila Esta Kumbia"
(duet with Kumbia Kings)
2005 44 16 Duetos
"Bidi Bidi Bom Bom"
(duet with Selena Gomez)
2012 8 Enamorada de Ti
"Fotos Y Recuerdos"
(duet with Don Omar)
13
"Amor Prohibido"
(duet with Samo Parra)
14
"Como La Flor"
(duet with Christian Castro)
25
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

1.^ Many music critics believed that four released singles from Amor Prohibido all peaked at number-one on the Hot Latin Tracks (excluding "Techno Cumbia").[33] However, according to Billboard five released singles ("Amor Prohibido", "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", "No Me Queda Más", "Techno Cumbia" and "Fotos y Recuerdos") from Amor Prohibido all peaked at number one on the Hot Latin Tracks charts.[34] Two of which, "Fotos y Recuerdos" and "Techno Cumbia" peaked at number-one posthumously in 1995.[35]
2.^ United States sales figures for "Amor Prohibido" as of 2005.[36]
3.^ United States digital sales figures for "Dreaming of You" as of 2010.[37]
4.^ "I'm Getting Used to You" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number seven on Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles, which acts as a 25-song extension to the Hot 100.[38]
5.^ Year it peaked on the chart.
6.^ United States sales figures for "Donde Quiera Que Estés" as of 2000.[39]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ragland, Cathy (24 March 1996). "With Respect". Austin American-Statesman. Ragland, Cathy: ""Como la flor" is also the title of one of Selena's most popular songs and, for many, a metaphor for her life- a beautiful, delicate creature who had [...]". 
  2. ^ Flores, Matt (25 October 1995). "Most fans call for sentence of life in prison - Visitors flock to home, grave". San Antonio Express-News. Flores, Matt: "To the side of the painting were the words "Como La Flor," (Like a flower), the title of one of the slain star's most popular songs." 
  3. ^ "Grammy winning singer Selena shot to death". The Hour. 1 April 1995. Retrieved 10 October 2011. 
  4. ^ "Tejano Singer Shot To Death". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. 1 April 1995. Retrieved 10 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Selena's Death Shocks Hispanics". The Victoria Advocate. 1 April 1995. Retrieved 10 October 2011. 
  6. ^ "Topping The Charts Year By Year". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 110 (48): LMQ3. 28 November 1998. Retrieved 3 March 2010. 
  7. ^ Rivas, Jorge (31 March 2011). "Remembering Selena's Trailblazing Music". Colorlines. Retrieved 14 April 2011. 
  8. ^ "Selena, a 13 años de su muerte". Vanguardia. 31 March 2008. Retrieved 10 October 2011. 
  9. ^ Danini, Carmina (21 July 1995). "Selena fans scoop up CD in Mexico". San Antonio Express-News. Danini, Carmina: "The song also is included in the new album, as is "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom," another favorite with Mexican fans." 
  10. ^ Sam Howe Verhovek (1 April 1995). "Grammy Winning Singer Selena Killed in Shooting at Texas Motel". The New York Times. p. 1. 
  11. ^ Valdes, Alisa (7 April 1995). "Loving Selena, fans loved themselves". Boston Globe. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  12. ^ Darling, Cary (30 July 1995). "Death Only Fuels Selena's Climb Up The Charts". The Buffalo News. Retrieved 24 January 2012.  (subscription required)
  13. ^ Tarradell, Mario (16 July 1995). "Dreaming of Selena A new album celebrates what she was but only hints at what she could have become". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 24 January 2012.  (subscription required)
  14. ^ Tarradell, Mario (1 April 1995). "Singer soared beyond traditional limits on Tejano music". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 21 July 2011. 
  15. ^ Lannert, John (23 September 1995). "Selena Impossible To Forget". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (38): 112. Retrieved 25 June 2012. 
  16. ^ Lannert, John (2 September 1995). "The Selena Phenomenon". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (35): 120. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  17. ^ Jusino, Teresa (24 September 2010). ""La Leyenda" Lives On: An Interview with Selena's Sister". 8 July 2010. PopMatters. Retrieved 24 September 2010. 
  18. ^ Crowe, Jerry (8 January 1996). "'West Side Story' Goes South, and to R&B and Jazz; Music: A diverse group of singers and musicians offers new versions of celebrated songs from the hit musical on a new recording due out this month.". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 8 December 2011.  (subscription required)
  19. ^ "Selena sigue viva". NotiMex (in Spanish). 12 March 2004. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  20. ^ "‘Selena ¡Vive!’, de Univision, bate récords de audiencia". Hispanic Puerto Rican Wire (in Spanish). 11 April 2005. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  21. ^ Mayfield, Geoff (25 December 1999). "Totally '90s: Diary of a Decade". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 111 (52): YE-16–18. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 30 March 2010. 
  22. ^ Rivas, Jorge. "Selena Quintanilla Wins Billboard Award 16 Years After Her Death". Colorlines. Retrieved 6 July 2012. 
  23. ^ "Selena > Chart history > Hot 100". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  24. ^ a b "Selena > Chart history > Adult Contemporary Tracks". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  25. ^ a b c d Peak chart positions on the Latin Regional Digital Songs chart:
  26. ^ a b c d e Peak chart positions on the Hot Latin Tracks:
  27. ^ a b c "Selena > Chart history > Latin Regional Mexican Airplay". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  28. ^ a b c d "Selena > Chart history > Latin Pop Airplay". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  29. ^ "Billboard Hot Dance Breakouts". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 108 (15): 104. 1996. Retrieved 26 April 2011. 
  30. ^ "Billboard Hot Dance Breakouts Chart". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 108 (10): 100. 1996. Retrieved 6 May 2011. 
  31. ^ "Selena > Chart history > Hot Ringtones". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 6 July 2012. 
  32. ^ "Rhythmic Top 40 > 1 July 1995". Billboard.com. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 13 August 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  33. ^ Encyclopedia of World Biography Supplement. Gale Research. 1998. p. 500. ISBN 0-7876-2945-6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  34. ^ "Hot Latin Songs > Selena archives". Billboard.com. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 
  35. ^ Lannert, John (10 June 1995). "A Retrospective". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (23): 112. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  36. ^ E. Skidmore, Thomas; Smith, Peter H. (2005). Modern Latin America (6th ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-517012-1. 
  37. ^ Ben-Yehuda, Ayala (19 February 2010). "15 years after her murder, Selena still sells". Reuters. Retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  38. ^ "Billboard Chart Search: 'I '​m Getting Used to You'" (XML). Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 13 April 1996. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  39. ^ R. Maciel, David (2000). Chicano renaissance: contemporary cultural trends (1st ed.). Univ. of Arizona Press. ISBN 0-8165-2020-8. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]