Encryption

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This article is about algorithms for encryption and decryption. For an overview of cryptographic technology in general, see Cryptography.

In cryptography, encryption is the process of encoding messages or information in such a way that only authorized parties can read it.[1] Encryption does not of itself prevent interception, but denies the message content to the interceptor.[2]:374 In an encryption scheme, the message or information, referred to as plaintext, is encrypted using an encryption algorithm, generating ciphertext that can only be read if decrypted.[2] For technical reasons, an encryption scheme usually uses a pseudo-random encryption key generated by an algorithm. It is in principle possible to decrypt the message without possessing the key, but, for a well-designed encryption scheme, large computational resources and skill are required. An authorised recipient can easily decrypt the message with the key, provided by the originator to recipients but not to unauthorised interceptors.

Kinds of encryption[edit]

Symmetric key encryption[edit]

In symmetric-key schemes,[3] the encryption and decryption keys are the same. Thus communicating parties must have the same key before they can achieve secret communication.

Public key encryption[edit]

Illustration of how a file or document is sent using Public key encryption.


In public-key encryption schemes, the encryption key is published for anyone to use and encrypt messages. However, only the receiving party has access to the decryption key that enables messages to be read.[4] Public-key encryption was first described in a secret document in 1973;[5] before then all encryption schemes were symmetric-key (also called private-key).[2]:478

A publicly available public key encryption application called Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) was written in 1991 by Phil Zimmermann, and distributed free of charge with source code; it was purchased by Symantec in 2010.[6]

Uses of encryption[edit]

Encryption has long been used by militaries and governments to facilitate secret communication. It is now commonly used in protecting information within many kinds of civilian systems. For example, the Computer Security Institute reported that in 2007, 71% of companies surveyed utilized encryption for some of their data in transit, and 53% utilized encryption for some of their data in storage.[7] Encryption can be used to protect data "at rest", such as files on computers and storage devices (e.g. USB flash drives). In recent years there have been numerous reports of confidential data such as customers' personal records being exposed through loss or theft of laptops or backup drives. Encrypting such files at rest helps protect them should physical security measures fail. Digital rights management systems, which prevent unauthorized use or reproduction of copyrighted material and protect software against reverse engineering (see also copy protection), is another somewhat different example of using encryption on data at rest.[citation needed]

Encryption is also used to protect data in transit, for example data being transferred via networks (e.g. the Internet, e-commerce), mobile telephones, wireless microphones, wireless intercom systems, Bluetooth devices and bank automatic teller machines. There have been numerous reports of data in transit being intercepted in recent years.[8] Encrypting data in transit also helps to secure it as it is often difficult to physically secure all access to networks.[citation needed]

Message verification[edit]

Encryption, by itself, can protect the confidentiality of messages, but other techniques are still needed to protect the integrity and authenticity of a message; for example, verification of a message authentication code (MAC) or a digital signature. Standards for cryptographic software and hardware to perform encryption are widely available, but successfully using encryption to ensure security may be a challenging problem. A single slip-up in system design or execution can allow successful attacks. Sometimes an adversary can obtain unencrypted information without directly undoing the encryption. See, e.g., traffic analysis, TEMPEST, or Trojan horse.[citation needed]

Digital signature and encryption must be applied to the ciphertext when it is created (typically on the same device used to compose the message) to avoid tampering; otherwise any node between the sender and the encryption agent could potentially tamper with it. Encrypting at the time of creation is only secure if the encryption device itself has not been tampered with.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Encryption Basics | EFF Surveillance Self-Defense Project." Encryption Basics | EFF Surveillance Self-Defense Project. Surveillance Self-Defense Project, n.d. Web. 06 Nov. 2013. <https://ssd.eff.org/tech/encryption>.
  2. ^ a b c Goldreich, Oded. Foundations of Cryptography: Volume 2, Basic Applications. Vol. 2. Cambridge university press, 2004.
  3. ^ Symmetric-key encryption software
  4. ^ Bellare, Mihir. "Public-Key Encryption in a Multi-user Setting: Security Proofs and Improvements." Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2000. Page 1.
  5. ^ "Public-Key Encryption - how GCHQ got there first!". gchq.gov.uk. Archived from the original on May 19, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Symantec buys encryption specialist PGP for $300M". Computerworld. 2010-04-29. Retrieved 2010-04-29. 
  7. ^ Robert Richardson, 2008 CSI Computer Crime and Security Survey at 19.i.cmpnet.com
  8. ^ Fiber Optic Networks Vulnerable to Attack, Information Security Magazine, November 15, 2006, Sandra Kay Miller

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]