Endothelial microparticle

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Endothelial microparticles are small vesicles that are released from endothelial cells and can be found circulating in the blood.[1] The microparticle consists of a plasma membrane surrounding a small amount of cytosol. The membrane of the endothelial microparticle contains receptors and other cell surface molecules which enable the identification of the endothelial origin of the microparticle, and allow it to be distinguished from microparticles from other cells, such as platelets.

Although circulating endothelial microparticles can be found in the blood of normal individuals, increased numbers of circulating endothelial microparticles have been identified in individuals with certain diseases, including hypertension and cardiovascular disorders,[2] and pre-eclampsia [3] and various forms of vasculitis. The endothelial microparticles in some of these disease states have been shown to have arrays of cell surface molecules reflecting a state of endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, endothelial microparticles may be useful as an indicator or index of the functional state of the endothelium in disease, and may potentially play key roles in the pathogenesis of certain diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Davizon, Pavela & López, José (September 2009). "Microparticles and thrombotic disease.". Current Opinion in Hematology 16 (5): 334–341. doi:10.1097/MOH.0b013e32832ea49c. PMID 19606028. 
  2. ^ Boulanger, Chantal M (March 2010). "Microparticles, vascular function and hypertension.". Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension 19 (2): 177–180. doi:10.1097/MNH.0b013e32833640fd. 
  3. ^ Ling L (Feb 2014). "Evaluation of plasma endothelial microparticles in pre-eclampsia.". J Int Med Res 42 (1): 42–51. PMID 24319051. 
  4. ^ Boilard, E. et al. (January 2010). "Platelets Amplify Inflammation in Arthritis via Collagen-Dependent Microparticle Production". Science 327 (5965): 580–583. doi:10.1126/science.1181928. PMC 2927861. PMID 20110505.