Energy in Denmark

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Denmark ranks as number 32 in the world among net exporters of crude oil.
This article describes energy and electricity production, consumption, import and export in Denmark.

Denmark has considerable sources of oil and natural gas in the North Sea and ranks as number 32 in the world among net exporters of crude oil.[1] Denmark expects to be self-sufficient with oil until 2050.[2] However, gas resources are expected to decline, and production may decline below consumption in 2020, making imports necessary.[3] A large proportion of electricity is produced from coal; wind turbines meet about 30% of electricity demand by 2013 (see Wind power in Denmark).

In February 2011 the Danish government announced the "Energy Strategy 2050" with the aim to be fully independent of fossil fuels by 2050[4] The European Renewables Directive set a mandatory target at 30% share of energy from renewable sources by 2020.[5] The government targets 50% wind power in the electricity system by 2020.[6]

Denmark's electrical grid is connected by transmission lines to other European countries,[7] and has according to the World Economic Forum the best energy security in the EU.[8]

Overview[edit]

Energy in Denmark[9]
Year Capita
(million)
Prim. energy
(TWh)
Production
(TWh)
Export
(TWh)
Electricity
(TWh)
CO2-emission
(Mt)
2004 5.40 233 361 117 35.8 50.9
2007 5.46 229 314 64 36.4 50.5
2008 5.49 221 309 54 35.5 48.4
2009 5.52 216 278 43 34.5 46.8
2010 5.55 224 271 42 35.1 47.0
2012 5.57 209 244 19 34.1 41.7
change
2004 to 2012
+3.7% -10% -32% -84% -4.7% -18%
 Mtoe = 11.63 TWh. Prim. energy includes energy losses.

Energy sources[edit]

Solar[edit]

Denmark already reached its year 2020 governmental goal of installing 200 MW of photovoltaic capacity in 2012.[10] As of 2013, the total PV capacity from 90,000 private installations amounts to 500 MW.[11] Danish energy sector players estimate that this development will result in 1000 MW by 2020 and 3400 MW by 2030.[10]

Coal[edit]

Fossil fuel consumption in Denmark.
Main article: Coal power in Denmark

Coal power provided 48.0% of the electricity and 22.0% of the heat in district heating in Denmark in 2008; and in total provided 21.6% of total energy consumption (187PJ out of 864PJ)[12] and is based mainly on coal imported from outside Europe.[13]

Oil[edit]

The production of crude oil fell from 523 PJ in 2010 to 470 PJ in 2011. Consumption fell from 315 to 306 PJ. [14] As of May 2014, Denmark produced an average of 171,000 mbpd.[15]

Natural gas[edit]

The production of natural gas fell from 307 PJ in 2010 to 265 PJ in 2011. Consumption fell from 187 to 157 PJ.[14]

CO2 emissions from energy production fell from 49.4 to 44.3 million tons, from 2010 to 2011,[14] a decline of 10%.[16]

Geothermal[edit]

Denmark has two geothermal district heating plants, one in Thisted started in 1988, and one in Copenhagen started in 2005.[17][18] They produce no electricity.

Wind power[edit]

Main article: Wind power in Denmark

Wind provides 30% of the electricity generated in Denmark.[19][20] Denmark is a long-time leader in wind energy, and as of May 2011 Denmark derives 3.1 percent of its Gross Domestic Product from renewable (Clean) energy technology and energy efficiency, or around Euro6.5 billion ($9.4 billion).[21]

To encourage investment in wind power, families were offered a tax exemption for generating their own electricity within their own or an adjoining commune. While this could involve purchasing a turbine outright, more often families purchased shares in wind turbine cooperatives which in turn invested in community wind turbines. By 2004 over 150,000 Danes were either members of cooperatives or owned turbines, and about 5,500 turbines had been installed, although with greater private sector involvement the proportion owned by cooperatives had fallen to 75%.

Electricity[edit]

The electricity sector relies on fossil energy and renewable energy: wind power, biogas, biomass and waste. The average consumption of electricity per person was 0.8 GWh less than EU 15 average in 2008. Denmark invested in the wind power development in the 1970s and has been the top wind power country of the world ever since. Danish consumption of wind electricity has been highest in the world per person: 1,218 kWh in 2009. Denmark produced more wind power per person in 2009 than Spain or the UK produced nuclear power.

Because of energy taxes, Denmark has the highest household electricity prices in the world.[22] while industries pay just below EU average.[23] Transmission costs are around 7 øre/kWh, and support regimes cost 19 øre/kWh in 2014.[24]


Cities[edit]

Copenhagen has target to be carbon-neutral by 2025.[25]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "EIA – International Energy Data and Analysis for Denmark". Tonto.eia.doe.gov. 15 May 2009. Retrieved 29 May 2009. 
  2. ^ Unforeseen billions from North Sea Maritime, 4 December 2011. Accessed: 8 December 2011.
  3. ^ Andersen, Christian Meiniche. Gas supply 2011-2013 page 17 Energinet.dk. Accessed: 8 December 2011.
  4. ^ "Release of Danish Energy Strategy 2050". Danish Ministry of Climate and Energy. 24 February 2011. Retrieved 19 May 2011. 
  5. ^ as measured in gross final consumption of energy
  6. ^ Danish Wind Industry Association, Wind energy Denmark, n.d.
  7. ^ Gellert, Bjarne Christian. Electricity interconnections Energinet.dk, 22 August 2011. Accessed: 6 December 2011.
  8. ^ "Danish security of supply is number one in the EU" Energinet.dk, 11 December 2013. Accessed: 26 December 2013.
  9. ^ IEA Key World Energy Statistics Statistics 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2006 IEA October, crude oil p.11, coal p. 13 gas p. 15
  10. ^ a b Denmark reaches 2020-goal for solar energy before time 12.09.2012
  11. ^ "Follow the solar cells" Energinet.dk, 18 December 2013. Accessed: 26 December 2013.
  12. ^ "Energy Statistics 2008". Retrieved 2010-07-22. 
  13. ^ Hansen, Jens Morten. "Dänemark - Produktion und Kommunikation - Energie" (in German). The Royal Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 17 May 2010. [dead link]
  14. ^ a b c Main energy statistics 2011 Danish Ministry of Climate and Energy, 20 March 2012. Accessed: 20 March 2012.
  15. ^ Danish Production of Oil, Gas and Water for May 2014 Danish Energy Agency, May 2014. Accessed: 26 June 2014.
  16. ^ Dal, Peter. Large drop in energy and CO2 Danish Ministry of Climate and Energy, 20 March 2012. Accessed: 20 March 2012. Quote: ""
  17. ^ Thisted Varmeforsyning Geotermi
  18. ^ Allan Mahler & Jesper Magtengaard, Proceeding World Geothermal Congress 2005, Geothermal Development in Denmark, Country Update WGC 2005
  19. ^ http://www.ens.dk/graphics/Publikationer/Statistik_UK/Energy_statics_2006/html/chapter03.htm
  20. ^ En visionr dansk energipolitik frem til 2025
  21. ^ Rank-1 in Clean Energy
  22. ^ Electricity Prices for Households Energy information administration
  23. ^ Danish Energy Agency
  24. ^ "Energinet.dk holds tariffs down - PSO tariff rises" Energinet.dk, 11 December 2013. Accessed: 26 December 2013.
  25. ^ Copenhagen's ambitious push to be carbon-neutral by 2025 Guardian 12 April 2013

External links[edit]