English River (Ontario)

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For other places with the same name, see English River (disambiguation).
Coordinates: 50°12′05″N 95°00′13″W / 50.20139°N 95.00361°W / 50.20139; -95.00361
English River
River
Country Canada
Province Ontario
Region Northwestern Ontario
Districts Kenora, Thunder Bay
Part of Hudson Bay drainage basin
Source Unnamed lake
 - elevation 502 m (1,647 ft)
 - coordinates 49°13′22″N 90°46′48″W / 49.22278°N 90.78000°W / 49.22278; -90.78000
Mouth Winnipeg River
 - elevation 298 m (978 ft)
 - coordinates 50°12′05″N 95°00′13″W / 50.20139°N 95.00361°W / 50.20139; -95.00361
Length 615 km (382 mi)
Basin 52,300 km2 (20,193 sq mi)
Location of the mouth of the English River in Ontario
The English River was on the canoe route James Bay, Albany River, English River, Lake Winnipeg

The English River is a river in Kenora District and Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada.[1] It flows through Lac Seul to join the Winnipeg River as a right tributary.[2] The river is in the Hudson Bay drainage basin, is 615 kilometres (382 mi) long and has a drainage basin of 52,300 square kilometres (20,200 sq mi).[3] There are several hydroelectric plants on this river.

There is also a settlement on the river called English River, located where Ontario Highway 17 crosses the river at its confluence with the Scotch River, along with a nearby railway point of the same name, constructed as part of the Canadian Pacific Railway transcontinental main line.[4]

Course[edit]

For a map showing the river course, see this reference.[2]

The English River flows through Lac Seul to its mouth at the Winnipeg River, which flows via the Nelson River to Hudson Bay.

Tributaries[edit]

Settlements[edit]

  • Caribou Falls
  • Ear Falls
  • Kejick Bay / Lac Seul First Nation
  • Sioux Lookout
  • English River

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Other map sources:

Derived its name from John Samuels son William Marchington. William, who was a Parliamentary writer and later editor of Canada's national newspaper the 'Globe & Mail'. William also wrote for a couple of English newspapers. William had a golfing buddy who was a Cartographer, and as such he asked to use William's surname to name areas in the 'back country' of Ontario