Enid Derham

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Enid Derham (24 March 1882 – 13 November 1941, age 59) was an Australian poet and academic.

Life[edit]

Derham was born in Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, the eldest daughter of Thomas Plumley Derham, solicitor, and his wife Ellen Hyde, née Hodgson, of Melbourne.[1] Derham was educated at Hessle College, Camberwell, then at Presbyterian Ladies' College and the University of Melbourne. She graduated M.A. with final honours in classics in 1903, and subsequently studied at Oxford University.

Derham lectured in English at the University of Western Australia in 1921 and was appointed senior lecturer in English at the University of Melbourne in 1922, and held this position for the rest of her life. She died suddenly of a brain haemorrhage at her home in 1941.

Writing career[edit]

In 1912 she published The Mountain Road and Other Verses, and Empire: A Morality Play for Children. She also edited books of prose, poetry and drama. A posthumous selection of her best poems .[1]

Melbourne University Press released a posthumous anthology of her best work called Poems in 1952 which established her reputation as a poet.

While her poetry was influenced by her classical studies, she was one of the earliest Australian writers to recognise the poetry of Emily Dickinson.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Imelda Palmer (1981). "Derham, Enid (1882 - 1941)". Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 8. MUP. p. 289. Retrieved 2008-09-16. 
  2. ^ Adelaide, Debra (1988) Australian women writers: a bibliographic guide p.49, London, Pandora