Enon, South Africa

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Enon
Enon is located in South Africa
Enon
Enon
 Enon shown within South Africa
Coordinates: 33°23′53″S 25°32′42″E / 33.398°S 25.545°E / -33.398; 25.545Coordinates: 33°23′53″S 25°32′42″E / 33.398°S 25.545°E / -33.398; 25.545
Country South Africa
Province Eastern Cape
District Cacadu
Municipality Sundays River Valley
Area[1]
 • Total 1.4 km2 (0.5 sq mi)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Total 2,160
 • Density 1,500/km2 (4,000/sq mi)
Racial makeup (2011)[1]
 • Black African 47.3%
 • Coloured 51.9%
 • Indian/Asian 0.1%
 • Other 0.7%
First languages (2011)[1]
 • Afrikaans 52.1%
 • Xhosa 43.6%
 • English 1.5%
 • Other 2.8%
Postal code (street) 6125
PO box 6125

Enon is a small town in the Eastern Cape in South Africa. It is named after the biblical place mentioned in John 3:23[2] It lies 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) east of Kirkwood and 60 kilometres (37 mi) north-east of Uitenhage.

Enon (formerly known as Witterivier) was formed in 1818 by the Moravian Missionary Society on request of the Area Landdrost Jacob Glen Cuyler,[3] to serve as a buffer between the Xhosa, Tembu and Fingo tribes living outside the Cape Colony and the European farmers and towns inside the Cape Colony.[4] The land was granted to the Missionary Society in trust, to be administrated on behalf of the Cape Colony in the interests of residents of the missionary station.[5]

Within the first 35 years of its inception it was caught in the middle of three Cape Frontier Wars and the First Anglo-Boer War,[6] and has been evacuated three separate occasions.[7][8][9]

In 1909 control of the town was ceded back to the Union of South Africa.[10] The governance of Enon currently falls under the Sundays River Valley Local Municipality.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sum of the Main Places Enon and Barsheba from Census 2011.
  2. ^ Raper 1989, p. 155.
  3. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 3.
  4. ^ de Boer & Temmers 1987, p. 3.
  5. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 6.
  6. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 23.
  7. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 8.
  8. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 10.
  9. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 51.
  10. ^ Temmers 1987, p. 16.

Bibliography[edit]