Enter the Game of Death

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Enter the Game of Death
십자수권
Enter The Game Of Death poster.jpg
Produced by Kim Tae-Soo
Robert Jeffery
Written by Her Jin
Starring Bruce Le
Bolo Yeung
Yeo Su-jin
Nick Cheung Lik
Nam Seok-hun
Lee Hoi Sang
Park Dong-Yong
Shim Sang-Cheon
Chu Chi-Ling
Kim Wang-Kuk
Kim Ki-Bum
Music by Jeong Min-seob
Cinematography Jin Young-ho
Edited by Hyeon Dong-chun
Production
  company
Tae Chang Enterprises Co.
PT Insantra
Distributed by United States Cinematic
Release date(s) South Korea November 3, 1978
United StatesFebruary, 1980
Hong Kong May 7, 1981
Running time 80 min.
Country South Korea
Hong Kong
Language Korean
Cantonese

Enter the Game of Death (Hanja: 十字手拳, Chinese: 死亡魔塔), originally released as Cross Hands Martial Arts and released in North America as The King of Kung Fu, is a Bruceploitation martial arts film inspired by Bruce Lee's unfinished film Game of Death. It stars the notorious Lee imitator Bruce Le.

Plot[edit]

There's a mysterious Chinese document that's hidden in the Tower of Death, and evil Japanese occupiers want to get their hands on it. Meanwhile, a Chinese fighter (Bruce Le) is training in the forest, only to be challenged by several Japanese fighters as well as Bolo Yeung. He defeats the other fighters, but flees from Bolo when he pulls out a sword. Bruce and Bolo meet again in a wrestling ring, where Bruce once again defeats Bolo.

Bruce's victory impresses the Japanese who want to hire him to go to the Tower of Death. However, Bruce is a Chinese nationalist and refuses. This leads to Bruce being challenged by another group of Japanese fighters in another forest, with Bruce once again reigning victorious. Shortly afterwards, Bruce discovers that a woman he thought was working for the Japanese is actually an undercover Chinese agent. They make a plan to retrieve the document from the Tower of Death.

Like in Bruce Lee's Game of Death, Bruce Le arrives at the Tower of Death and ascends to the top level, defeating a different kung fu master at each floor. At the top level, he gets the document. From here on, Bruce defeats the Japanese bosses once and for all.

Reaction[edit]

Some consider Enter the Game of Death to be one of Bruce Le's best movies, because of its abundant fight scenes and surreal touches. An example would be a review by "James" at the website Bruceploitation:

"The DVD cover states that many consider this to be Bruce Le's best film to date. It's certainly one of the best...This movie is a must for all who love Bruce Le and great martial arts movies."[1]

Of course, there are some people who truly hate this film, including Joe909 at cityonfire.com:

"This movie proves yet again that Bruce Le sucks, and was the worst "fake Bruce" of them all. Even Dragon Lee had some charm, compared to him. The reason behind Le's loathsomeness is the audacious levels of "action" he and his producers packed into each of his movies; plot, character development, and even dialog were cast aside whenever possible and replaced by unending kung-fu battles. At least Bruce Le was a good martial artist, with some impressive kicks, but the guy just looks too goofy with his overdone "Bruce Lee" expressions and mannerisms."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Many Bruces on GeoCities redirects to BruceSploitation.Net which is a dead link
  2. ^ CityOnFire.com's Hong Kong Films "Enter Game"

External links[edit]