Enthesis

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Enthesis
Joint.png
Typical Joint
Identifiers
Code TH H3.03.00.0.00034
Anatomical terminology

The enthesis (plural: entheses) is the connective tissue between tendon or ligament and bone.[1]

There are two types of entheses: Fibrous entheses and fibrocartilaginous entheses.

In a fibrous enthesis, the collagenous tendon or ligament directly attaches to the bone, whereas the fibrocartilaginous interface encompasses four transition zones:

  1. Tendinous area displaying longitudinally oriented fibroblasts and a parallel arrangement of collagen fibres
  2. Fibrocartilaginous region of variable thickness where the structure of the cells changes to chondrocytes
  3. Abrupt transition from cartilaginous to calcified fibrocartilage—the so-called 'tidemark' or 'blue line'
  4. Bone

Etymology[edit]

"Enthesis" is rooted in the Ancient Greek word, "ἔνθεσις" or "énthesis," meaning “putting in," or "insertion." This refers to the role of the enthesis as the site of attachment of bones with tendons or ligaments.

Pathology[edit]

A disease of the entheses is known as an enthesopathy or enthesitis.[2] Enthetic degeneration is characteristic of spondyloarthropathy and other pathologies.

The enthesis is the primary site of disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "enthesis". Medcyclopaedia. GE. Archived from the original on 2012-02-05. 
  2. ^ Benjamin, M.; Toumi, H.; Ralphs, J. R.; Bydder, G.; Best, T. M.; Milz, S. (April 2006). "Where tendons and ligaments meet bone: Attachment sites (‘entheses’) in relation to exercise and/or mechanical load". Journal of Anatomy 208 (4): 471–90. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7580.2006.00540.x. PMC 2100202. PMID 16637873. 

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]