Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital

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Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital
EFF-Logo Frog RGB.jpg
Location Washington, D.C.,  United States
Founded 1993 by Flo Stone
Awards 2013 Polly Krakora award for artistry in film, Harmony by Stuart Sender; 2012 Polly Krakora award for artistry in film, The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom by Lucy Walker; 2011 Polly Krakora award for artistry in film, Oil Rocks: City Above the Sea by Marc Wolfensberger; 2010 Polly Krakora award for artistry in film, The Music Tree by Otavio Juliano
Number of films 190 (2013)[1]
Language International
http://www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org

The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital is a film festival held annually in Washington, D.C., typically in March.

Mission[edit]

According to the festival's official website, "The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital seeks to advance public understanding of the environment through the power of film."[2]

History[edit]

From the official website of the festival: "Founded by Flo Stone in 1993, the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital has become one of the world’s largest and most influential showcases of environmental film and a major collaborative cultural event in Washington, D.C. Each March the Festival presents a diverse selection of high quality environmental films, including many Washington, D.C., U.S. and world premieres. Documentaries, features, animations and shorts are shown, as well as archival, experimental and children’s film at venues throughout the city. Films are screened at partnering museums, embassies, libraries, universities and local theaters and are attended by large audiences. Selected to provide fresh perspectives on global environmental issues, most Festival films are accompanied by discussions with filmmakers, environmental experts and special guests, including national decision makers and thought leaders, and are free to the public. The Festival’s Web site serves as a global resource for environmental film throughout the year."[2]

A March 10, 2007 article from The Washington Post stated that in the first year of the festival only 1,200 people attended.[3] In 2011 the festival had grown to 30,000 participants.

Venues[edit]

At the 2013 edition, the festival was held at 75 separate venues, including:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital. "2012 Schedule"
  2. ^ a b http://www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org/about/
  3. ^ Lerner, Joel M.; “Environmental Film Festival Features Many Visual Treats for Gardeners.” The Washington Post 10 March 2007. F04. [Online; 30 October 2007]

External links[edit]