Environmental geology

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Environmental geology, like hydrogeology, is an applied science concerned with the practical application of the principles of geology in the solving of environmental problems. It is a multidisciplinary field that is closely related to engineering geology and, to a lesser extent, to environmental geography. Each of these fields involves the study of the interaction of humans with the geologic environment, including the biosphere, the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, and to some extent the atmosphere.In other words Environmental geology is the application of geological information to solve conflicts, minimizing possible adverse environmental degradation or maximizing possible advantageous condition resulting from the use of natural and modified environment.

Environmental geology includes:

  • managing geological and hydrogeological resources such as fossil fuels, minerals, water (surface and ground water), and land use.
  • studying the earth's surface through the disciplines of geomorphology, and edaphology;
  • defining and mitigating exposure of natural hazards on humans
  • managing industrial and domestic waste disposal and minimizing or eliminating effects of pollution, and
  • performing associated activities, often involving litigation.

A peer-reviewed journal in the field is Environmental Earth Sciences (ISSN: 1866-6280),[1] formerly Environmental Geology (ISSN: 0943-0105).

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Environmental Earth Sciences". Springer. Retrieved 2010-08-31. 

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