Eon McKai

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Eon McKai
L e6c80b12aab73cd3979e71308e5db8ae.jpg
Occupation Adult film director
Years active 2004–present
Website
http://www.eonmckai.com/

Eon McKai (born 1979) is an American director of alt porn-themed pornographic films. The name "Eon McKai" is a pseudonym and a tribute to punk singer Ian MacKaye.[1]

McKai was involved in the internet-based alt porn scene soon after its emergence and photographed some of the early sets on SuicideGirls.[2] After graduating from the California Institute of the Arts School of Film/Video, he decided he wanted to go into directing pornography and introduced himself to Pornographic film directors Veronica Hart. Hart put him in touch with the adult video company VCA Pictures, who signed him as a director in 2004.[3] In 2006, after producing several features for VCA, McKai was signed by Vivid to head a new imprint of theirs called VividAlt.[4]

McKai's films are alt porn-themed hardcore pornographic films, casting younger actors with an "alternative" punk, goth, or otherwise subcultural look, many of whom are not established porn actors. Going against the predominant trends in adult video, McKai prefers to shoot features with a plotline and high production values rather than gonzo porn. His influences include Andy Warhol, early "artistic" pornographic directors such as Alex de Renzy, The Dark Brothers, and Stephen Sayadian, as well as the aesthetic of alt porn websites such as SuicideGirls, BurningAngel, and GodsGirls.[2][5]

McKai's work has generally been well received by alt porn fans, but has also been criticized by those who feel that he is appropriating the aesthetic of alternative subcultures for use in pornography, or who question his credibility and connection to alternative subcultures. After leaving the porn industry, one of the actresses in his films, Keiko, referred to McKai as "edgy as a butterknife".[6][7] Others, such as porn reviewers Roger Pipe[8] and Scott McGowan, denounce McKai for what they see as his artistic pretensions, with McGowan stating "If people jack off to your art, you're not the artist you think you are".[9] Tristan Taormino, however, has defended McKai's work as authentically based on his own lifestyle and sense of aesthetics, and views the idea of creating artistic porn as much more worthy than simply churning out product.[10]

Filmography[edit]

Director[edit]

  • Art School Sluts (2004)
  • Kill Girl Kill 1-3 (2005)
  • Neu Wave Hookers (2006)
  • Girls Lie (2006)
  • Debbie Loves Dallas (2007)[11]
  • The Doll Underground (2007)
  • On My Dirty Knees (2008)
  • Art School Girls Are Easy (2009)
  • Content (2009)
  • Tres Flores (2009)
  • Eyelashes (2010)

Producer / Executive Producer[edit]

  • The Rebelle Rousers (2006)
  • Man's Ruin (2007)
  • Morphine (2008)
  • Circa '82 (2008)
  • Sugar Town (2008)
  • Live In My Secrets (2009)
  • Pussy a Go Go! (2009)

Self[edit]

  • SexTV (Documentary) (2007)
  • Debbie Does Dallas Again (TV Series)
  • The New Erotic: Art Sex Revolution (2011)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dunlap, David Jr. (2005). "I Against...E". Washington City Paper, August 5, 2005. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  2. ^ a b Stoddard, Grant (2005). "The New Pornographer". Nerve.com. 
  3. ^ Luke Ford. "Eon McKai Interview". Luke is Back. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  4. ^ Fleshbot. (2006). "Eon McKai Goes Vivid". Fleshbot (website), February 16, 2006. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  5. ^ EonMcKai.com. (2004). "Bio: Who The Fuck Is Eon Mckai Anyway?". EonMcKai.com. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  6. ^ Ross, Gene. (2006). "Keiko: We're really Gonna Fuckin' Miss Ye". Adult FYI (website), February 15, 2006. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  7. ^ Odeo: Search, Discover and Share Digital Media from Millions of Audio and Video Clips
  8. ^ Pipe, Roger (2006). "DVD Review: Neu Wave Hookers". Rogreviews.com, September 5, 2006. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  9. ^ McGowan, Scott (2005). "Porn, Art, Subculture, and Other Words That Don’t Go Together". EyeOnAdult.com, September 14, 2005. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  10. ^ Taormino, Tristan. (2005). "The Prince of Alt-Porn". Village Voice, November 11, 2005. Retrieved 2007-05-26. 
  11. ^ Fleshbot. (2007). "Vivid Alt's "Debbie <3 Dallas"". Fleshbot (website), June 21, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-16. 

External links[edit]