Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida

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Diocese of Southeast Florida
CoA Diocese of Southeast Florida.jpg
Location
Ecclesiastical province Province IV
Statistics
Congregations 83
Information
Rite Episcopal
Cathedral Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Miami
Current leadership
Bishop Leopold Frade
Map
Location of the Diocese of Southeast Florida
Location of the Diocese of Southeast Florida
Website
www.diosef.org

The Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America (ECUSA) which extends from Key West on the south, to Jensen Beach on the north and inland to Clewiston on the west. Major cities in the diocese are Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. The diocese takes in all of Miami-Dade County, Broward County, Palm Beach County, and Martin County, along with the Florida Keys portion of Monroe County and the eastern part of Hendry County. The diocese is a part of Province IV of the Episcopal Church. The current Diocesan Bishop of Southeast Florida is the Cuban-born Right Reverend Leopold Frade. The cathedral church of the diocese is Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Miami. The diocese currently comprises 83 churches.[1] The philanthropic outreach arm of the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida is Episcopal Charities of Southeast Florida. [1]

History[edit]

The Diocese of Southeast Florida was created in 1969 when the Diocese of South Florida was split to form the dioceses of Central Florida, Southwest Florida and Southeast Florida.

Bishops of the Diocese[edit]

The Bishops of the Diocese of Southeast Florida are:

1. 1970-1980 James L. Duncan, First Bishop of Southeast Florida, was Suffragan Bishop of Episcopal Diocese of South Florida 1961-1969.

2. 1980-2000 Calvin O. Schofield, Jr., Second Bishop of Southeast Florida.

3. 2000-to date Leopold Frade. Third Bishop of Southeast Florida.[2]

NOTE: For earlier bishops, see the Episcopal Diocese of South Florida

Deaneries[edit]

In accordance with the usage in the ECUSA, the diocese is divided into seven deaneries each headed by a dean and named as follows:

  • 1. The Keys (the Florida Keys portion of Monroe County);
  • 2. South Dade (southern Miami-Dade County);
  • 3. North Dade (northern Miami-Dade County);
  • 4. Broward (Broward County);
  • 5. South Palm Beach (southern Palm Beach County); and
  • 6. North Palm Beach (northern Palm Beach County, a portion of eastern Hendry County and all of Martin County).

Controversy[edit]

In July, 1998 the Diocese issued a formal ecclesiastical presentment, which is a church document similar to an indictment, charging Rev. John Brackett, then rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with improper relationships with five women parishioners and financial misconduct during his nine years as rector of the parish.[3] Brackett had previously been relieved of his pastoral duties in April, 1998 and placed on paid leave, while the present rector Rev. Sherod Mallow, who was associate rector at that time, took over the responsibilities of running the parish during the investigation by church authorities.[4] In December, 1998, the parish announced that its Vestry had made a final, formal decision to terminate Brackett permanently "over his 'leadership style' and the apparent misuse of charity funds." [5]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Cushman, Joseph D., Jr., A Goodly Heritage: The Episcopal Church in Florida, 1821-1892, Gainesville: University of Florida Press (1965)

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Episcopal Church Annual (2007) Harrisburg: Morehouse Church Resources, pp. 359-361.
  2. ^ The Episcopal Church Annual (2007) Harrisburg: Morehouse Church Resources, pp. 359-361.
  3. ^ Davis,James D. "Episcopal Priest Accused of Misconduct With Women, Finances," South Florida Sun Sentinel. July 25, 1998, p. 1B.
  4. ^ Davis,James D. "All Saints' Rector Relieved of Church Duties, Complaint Filed Against Minister Unveiled to Members Tuesday," South Florida Sun Sentinel. April 18, 1998, p. 4B.
  5. ^ Davis,James D. "Church Fires Rector Over His Leadership; All Saints Board Cites Financial Mismanagement," South Florida Sun Sentinel. December 7, 1998, p. 1B.

External links[edit]