Roman Catholic Diocese of Senigallia

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Diocese of Senigallia
Dioecesis Senogalliensis
564SenigalliaDuomo.JPG
Cathedral of Senigallia
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Ancona-Osimo
Statistics
Area 580 km2 (220 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2010)
128,580
122,151 (95%)
Parishes 57
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 6th Century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Pietro Apostolo
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Giuseppe Orlandoni
Emeritus Bishops Odo Fusi Pecci
Map
Diocesi di Senigallia.svg
Website
www.diocesisenigallia.it

The Diocese of Senigallia (Latin: Dioecesis Senogalliensis) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in the Marche, Italy. It has existed since the sixth century. It is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo.[1]

History[edit]

Historically and until 2000, the diocese of Senigallia was a suffragan of the archdiocese of Urbino.

The patron saint of Senigallia is St. Paulinus, whose body is preserved in the cathedral (as is attested for the first time in 1397). He is, therefore, not identical with Paulinus of Nola, nor is it known to what epoch he belongs. The first bishop of certain date was Venantius (502).

About 562 the bishop was St. Bonifacius, who at the time of the Lombard invasion was martyred by the Arians. Under Bishop Sigismundus (c. 590) the relics of St. Gaudentius, Bishop of Rimini and martyr, were transported to Senigallia.

Other bishops of the diocese are:

Under Bishop Antonio Colombella (1438), an Augustinian, Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, lord of Senigallia and Rimini, angered by his resistance to the destruction of certain houses, caused the cathedral and the episcopal palace to be demolished. The precious materials were transported to Rimini and were used in the construction of S. Francesco (tempio Malatestiano). Under Bishop Marco Vigerio Della Rovere (1513) the new cathedral was begun in 1540; it was consecrated in 1595 by Pietro Ridolfi (1591), a learned writer.

Other bishops were:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page
  2. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.