Equestrian at the 1912 Summer Olympics

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The equestrian program at the 1912 Summer Olympics included five medal events. There were individual competitions in dressage, eventing, and show jumping. Team scores were also gathered and medals awarded for teams in the eventing and jumping competitions. Equestrian had been absent from the Olympic program since the 1900 Summer Olympics, making the 1912 Games the second time the sport was featured. 10 nations competed: Belgium, Chile, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the USA. Only Sweden and Germany were able to supply a full team for all 3 disciplines, with several countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Norway and the USA) having several riders and horses used in 2 or even all 3 disciplines. A total of 88 entries ran in the 3 events, with 62 riders and 70 horses.

Equestrian

Disciplines[edit]

Axel Nordlander, 1912 Olympic eventing gold medalist

Show Jumping[edit]

A total of 40 riders from 8 nations contested the jumping event, which consisted of a 15-obstacle, 29-effort course. It had a maximum height of 1.40 meters and width of 4.00 meters, and had to be completes a speed of 400 m/min. Individual and team competitions ran over the same course but were held separately. A maximum of 6 riders per country was allowed in the individual jumping event.

Dressage[edit]

The dressage competition had 21 riders from 8 countries. It differed from the current format in that it did not include movements such as piaffe and passage but required five jumps up to 1.10 meters in height and a final obstacle: a barrel that had to be jumped while it was rolled towards the horse. Riders could garner bonus points for riding with one hand.

Eventing[edit]

The eventing competition had 7 nations competing with a total of 27 riders. The team event had 3 or 4 riders per nation, who were required to be officers on army mounts. The format differed greatly from what is currently used, being held over 5 days. The first day was a 55km endurance ride to be completed in 4 hours, which included a 5 km, 12-obstacle cross-country course to be completed in 15 minutes. On the second day the horses were rested before coming out on the third day for a 3500m steeplechase over 10 obstacles, to be completed in 5min and 50 seconds. The fourth day was a jumping test, over a 15-obstacle course with a maximum height of 1.30 metes and 3.00 meters in width. The final day held the dressage test. Each phase could garner up to 10 points.

Medal summary[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual dressage
details
 Carl Bonde and Emperor (SWE)  Gustaf Adolf Boltenstern and Neptun (SWE)  Hans von Blixen-Finecke and Maggie (SWE)
Individual eventing
details
 Axel Nordlander and Lady Artist (SWE)  Friedrich von Rochow and Idealist (GER)  Jean Cariou and Cocotte (FRA)
Team eventing
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Axel Nordlander and Lady Artist
Nils Adlercreutz and Atout
Ernst Casparsson and Irmelin
Henric Horn af Åminne and Omen
 Germany (GER)
Friedrich von Rochow and Idealist
Richard von Schaesberg and Grundsee
Eduard von Lütcken and Blue Boy
Carl von Moers and May-Queen
 United States (USA)
Ben Lear and Poppy
John Montgomery and Deceive
Guy Henry and Chiswell
Ephraim Graham and Connie
Individual jumping
details
 Jean Cariou and Mignon (FRA)  Rabod von Kröcher and Dohna (GER)  Emmanuel de Blommaert and Clomore (BEL)
Team jumping
details
 Sweden (SWE)
Gustaf Lewenhaupt and Medusa
Gustaf Kilman and Gåtan
Hans von Rosen and Lord Iron
Fredrik Rosencrantz and Drabant
 France (FRA)
Michel Dufourt and Amazone
Jean Cariou and Mignon
Ernest Meyer and Allons-y
Gaston Seigner and Cocotte
 Germany (GER)
Sigismund Freyer and Ultimus
Wilhelm von Hohenau and Pretty Girl
Ernst Deloch and Hubertus
Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia and Gibson Boy

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 62 riders from 10 nations competed at the Stockholm Games:

  1. ^ Including one Polish horse rider, who competed for Russia.

Medal table[edit]

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Sweden (SWE) 4 1 1 6
2  France (FRA) 1 1 1 3
3  Germany (GER) 0 3 1 4
4  Belgium (BEL) 0 0 1 1
 United States (USA) 0 0 1 1

References[edit]