Erginus

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For the gastropod of Lottiidae family, see Erginus (gastropod).

In Greek mythology, Erginus[pronunciation?] (Ancient Greek: Ἐργῖνος) was king of Minyan Orchomenus in Boeotia. He was the son of Clymenus, his predecessor, and Buzyge (or Budeia);[1][2] his brothers were Arrhon, Azeus, Pyleus, and Stratius.[3] Erginus avenged his father's death at the hands of the Thebans; he made war against Thebes, inflicting a heavy defeat. The Thebans were compelled to pay King Erginus a tribute of 100 oxen per year for twenty years. However, the tribute ended earlier than Erginus expected, when Heracles attacked the Minyan emissaries sent to exact the tribute. This prompted a second war between Orchomenus and Thebes, only this time Thebes (under the leadership of Heracles) was victorious, and a double tribute was imposed on the Orchomenians.[4][5][6] Erginus was slain in battle according to the version of the story given by most ancient writers (e.g., the Bibliotheca, Strabo,[7] Eustathius). But according to Pausanias, Erginus was spared by Heracles and lived to a ripe old age, and even fathered two sons (Trophonius and Agamedes) on a younger woman.[8]

Some authors[9] identify him with Erginus, an Argonaut who piloted the Argo after Tiphys's death.[10] Elsewhere, however, the Argonaut Erginus is said to be the son of Poseidon, and to have resided in the Carian city of Miletus,[11][12][13][14] thus a distinct figure. Yet others suggested he was a son of Periclymenus.[15]

Erginus was also the name of:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 185
  2. ^ Eustathius on Homer, 1076. 26
  3. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 37. 1
  4. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2. 4. 11
  5. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 10. 3–5
  6. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 37. 2
  7. ^ Strabo, Geography, 9. 2. 40
  8. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 37. 4
  9. ^ Pindar, Olympian Ode 4. 19
  10. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 2. 895; Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica, 5. 65 & 8. 177
  11. ^ Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 185; 2. 896
  12. ^ Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica, 1. 415
  13. ^ Argonautica Orphica, 150
  14. ^ Scholia on Pindar, Pythian Ode 4. 61
  15. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 14
  16. ^ Statius, Thebaid, 9. 305
  17. ^ Plutarch, Quaestiones Graecae, 48