Eric Helland

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Eric Helland is a Professor, Robert Day School of Economics and Finance, at Claremont McKenna College and Claremont Graduate University, and Senior Economist, Institute for Civil Justice, RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA.[1]

Helland holds a B.A. (1991) from the University of Missouri and an M.A (1992) and Ph.D. in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis (1995). Helland is a member of the Board of Directors of the UCLA Center for Governance. He is the recipient of the Robert H. Durr Award from the Midwest Political Science Association and the Dean's Teaching Award from Ball State University. He has been Senior Economist at the Council of Economic Advisors and Visiting Professor of Economics at the Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State at the University of Chicago. From 2003 to 2004 he worked as the Senior Staff Economist on the Council of Economic Advisers.[2]

He holds professional associations with American Economic Association, Society for Empirical Legal Studies, and the American Law and Economics Association. His articles have appeared in such scholarly journal as the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Journal of Legal Studies, and Review of Economics and Statistics.[3][4]

Selected works[edit]

  • "The optimal jury size when jury deliberation follows a random walk" (with Yaron Raviv, Public Choice 134 (3-4): 255-262, 2008)
  • "The Tradeoffs between Regulation and Class Actions: Evidence from Insurance Litigation" (with Jon Klick, Journal of Tort Law 1(3): Article 2, 2008)
  • "Court Congestion as an Explanation for Rising Attorney Fees" (with Jonathan Klick, Journal of Legal Studies 36(1):1-17, 2007)
  • "Is Corporate Philanthropy an Agency Cost? (with Janet Smith and Bill Brown," Journal of Corporate Finance 12: 855-877, 2006)
  • "Reputational Penalties and the Merits of Class Action Securities Litigation" (Journal of Law and Economics 49(2):365-395, 2006)
  • "Data Watch: Tort-uring the Data (with Jonathan Klick and Alex Tabarrok," Journal of Economic Perspectives 19(2):207-220, 2005)
  • "The Fugitive: Evidence on Public versus Private Law Enforcement from Bail Jumping" (with Alex Tabarrok, Journal of Law and Economics 47(1):93-122, 2004)
  • "Regulation and the Evolution of Corporate Boards: Monitoring, Advising or Window Dressing?" (with Mike Sykuta, Journal of Law and Economics 47(1):167-193, 2004)

References[edit]

External links[edit]