Eric Laneuville

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Eric Laneuville
Eric Laneuville.jpg
Eric Laneuville, 1989
Born (1952-07-14) July 14, 1952 (age 62)
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
Occupation Actor, director, producer
Years active 1968–present

Eric Gerard Laneuville (born July 14, 1952) is an American television director, actor and martial artist. His first acting roles were in the science-fiction film The Omega Man (1971) with Charlton Heston, the ABC television series Room 222 (1970–1973), and a brief appearance as one of the subway station muggers in Death Wish opposite Charles Bronson. His role as Luther Hawkins in the television series St. Elsewhere is his best known role. He also starred in A Force of One playing Charlie, the stepson of Chuck Norris. In more recent years, he frequently directs such one-hour dramas as Ghost Whisperer and Lost. He directed Body of Proof episode "Missing".

Career[edit]

Acting[edit]

Laneuville began acting while attending Audubon Junior High School in the Crenshaw, Los Angeles, District. He often played juvenile characters younger than his own age. He appeared in several musicals staged at Audubon by drama teacher Mario Lomeli, including Bye Bye Birdie, Annie Get Your Gun, and Oklahoma!. While taking drama courses at nearby Susan Miller Dorsey High School, he began acting professionally, co-starring as a troubled youth in an award-winning television movie and becoming a semi-regular cast member on Room 222, including one episode in which he appeared with his future Force of One co-star, Chuck Norris. He appeared in three episodes of Sanford and Son, as Esther's adopted son. In 1982, he landed the role of Luther Hawkins in the television series St. Elsewhere. He stayed with the series until it ended in 1988.

Directing[edit]

Laneuville's first directing assignments were for episodes of St. Elsewhere. He has subsequently directed episodes of L.A. Law (1986), Quantum Leap (1989), Doogie Howser, M.D. (1990), NYPD Blue (1993), ER (1995), 413 Hope St., Gilmore Girls (2004), Lie to Me (2009), Monk (2005), The Mentalist (2009–12), Invasion, Medium, Lost (2005–08), Girlfriends, Everybody Hates Chris, Prison Break, Ghost Whisperer, and Grimm (2012–14). In 1992 he won an Emmy for directing the episode "All God's Children" of the NBC series I'll Fly Away.[1] He also directed the 2004 television film, America's Prince: The John F. Kennedy Jr. Story.

As his directing career took off, Laneuville's acting career continued only sporadically, usually in small cameo roles. His most recent on-camera appearance was in 2002, in a guest role as Dr. Lamar in the TV series Scrubs. He also appeared in the Fear of a Black Hat (1994), a mockumentary parodying 1990s hip-hop culture.

Producer credits[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows, 1946– Present. Ballantine Books. 2003. p. 1442. ISBN 0-345-45542-8. 

External links[edit]