Eric Rosenfeld

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Eric R. Rosenfeld was a trader and principal at Long-Term Capital Management, a major hedge fund that failed during the Russian financial crisis.

Early life[edit]

Mr. Rosenfeld was born in Boston, Massachusetts in June 1953. He received his B.S in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975 and a Ph.D. in Finance from MIT in 1979. As a graduate student at MIT, he worked with Mitch Kapor, future founder of Lotus, to create and sell a financial statistics program written in BASIC for an Apple II.[1]

From 1979 to 1984, Rosenfeld was an assistant professor of finance at Harvard Business School. At HBS, he taught the first year finance course.

Career[edit]

In July 1984, Rosenfeld joined Salomon Brothers as a trader in the Government Arbitrage Group. In 1985, he was appointed Vice President and in 1988, he was made Managing Director and co-Head of the Fixed Income Arbitrage Group. Rosenfeld was appointed head of the Government Trading Department, co-Head of the Domestic Fixed Income Sales and Trading Department, and a member of the Salomon Brothers Executive Committee in August 1991. He also served on the Risk Management and Capital Allocation committees until he left the firm in January of 1993.[2]

He then joined John Meriwether and a group of Salomon Brothers traders in starting Long-Term Capital Management.

About one year after LTCM's rescue, in 1999, he joined John Meriwether as a partner in JWM Partners LLC, which started operations with about $250 million under management. He left JWM Partners to join Paloma Partners, a Greenwich fund-of-funds.

In 2007, Rosenfeld founded Quantitative Alternatives LLC in Rye Brook, NY with Bruce Wilson and Robert Shustak.[3] The firm closed in late 2007.[4]

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