Erich Ribbeck

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Erich Ribbeck
Personal information
Date of birth (1937-06-13) 13 June 1937 (age 77)
Place of birth Wuppertal, Germany
Height 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in)
Playing position Defender
Youth career
SSV 1904 Wuppertal
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1959–1962 Wuppertaler SV
1962–1965 Viktoria Köln
Teams managed
1965–1967 Borussia Mönchengladbach (assistant)
1967–1968 Rot-Weiss Essen
1968–1973 Eintracht Frankfurt
1973–1978 1. FC Kaiserslautern
1978–1984 Germany (assistant)
1984–1985 Borussia Dortmund
1985–1988 Bayer Leverkusen
1992–1993 Bayern Munich
1995–1996 Bayer Leverkusen
1998–2000 Germany
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Erich Ribbeck (born 13 June 1937 in Wuppertal, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a former German footballer and manager, best known for coaching in the German Bundesliga.

Biography[edit]

As a player, Ribbeck had a career spanning most of the 1950s into the early 1960s with SSV 1904 Wuppertal, which has since merged with TSG Vohwinkel to form Wuppertaler SV. The highest level Ribbeck played was the Oberliga, part of the first tier of Germany which was then split into five regional divisions.

Club management[edit]

His very first coaching position he held at the age of 30 in 1967/68, when he took Rot-Weiss Essen to the second place in the western division of Germany's Level 2 league and thus to the promotion tournament, where the club ended up losing out against Hertha Berlin.

The next ten years he shared evenly with enagegements with Eintracht Frankfurt and 1. FC Kaiserslautern. In the Bundesliga these clubs remained on mediocre levels during his tenure. With Kaiserlautern he reached the German Cup final of 1976, losing 0–2 to Hamburger SV.

He achieved his only trophy when he won the UEFA Cup 1988 with Bayer Leverkusen. In the finals Leverkusen came back from 0–3 away to Espanyol Barcelona to win the eventual penalty shoot-out at home.

He was also runner-up in the German Championship of 1993 with Bayern Munich.

National team[edit]

Erich Ribbeck was originally considered as a candidate for the national team manager role after the resignation of Helmut Schön in 1978. Instead, Jupp Derwall was selected and it was not until 20 years later on 9 September 1998[1] that Ribbeck emerged from retirement in the Canary Islands to take over the German national team when other candidates had declined. At 61, he was the oldest appointee to the job. His two-year tenure marked the worst period in the modern history of Germany's national side. Ribbeck resigned after a string of results culminating in a group-stage exit from Euro 2000. Ribbeck resigned on 21 June 2000.[2]

His results as Germany's coach were 10 wins, 6 draws and 8 losses, the worst managerial performance of all time for a coach of the German national team.

Retirement[edit]

These days Ribbeck shares his residence between Pulheim and Tenerife.

Career statistics[edit]

As of 22 January 2014
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Rot-Weiss Essen 1 July 1967 30 June 1968 42 25 11 6 59.52
Eintracht Frankfurt 1 July 1968[3] 30 June 1973[3] 203 83 41 79 40.89 [3]
1. FC Kaiserslautern 1 July 1973 30 June 1978 196 87 33 76 44.39
Borussia Dortmund 28 October 1984[4] 30 June 1985[4] 25 10 4 11 40.00 [4]
Bayer Leverkusen 1 July 1985[5] 30 June 1988[5] 125 53 36 36 42.40 [5]
Bayern Munich 12 March 1992[6] 27 December 1993[6] 75 37 22 16 49.33 [6]
Bayer Leverkusen 10 April 1995[5] 28 April 1996[5] 48 17 18 13 35.42 [5]
Germany 9 September 1998[1] 21 June 2000[2] 24 10 6 8 41.67 [7]
Total 738 322 171 245 43.63

Honours[edit]

Managerial honours[edit]

Bayer 04 Leverkusen

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Nachfolge geklärt: Erich Ribbeck neuer Teamchef". kicker (in German). 9 September 1998. Retrieved 6 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Ribbeck quits as Germans head home". BBC. 21 June 2000. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Eintracht Frankfurt" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 22 January 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c "Borussia Dortmund - Trainerhistorie" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 22 January 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Bayer 04 Leverkusen" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 22 January 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c "Bayern München" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 22 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "Nationaltrainer" (in German). DFB. Retrieved 22 January 2014. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Gunder Bengtsson
UEFA Cup Winning Coach
1987–1988
Succeeded by
Ottavio Bianchi