Erie, Kansas

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Erie, Kansas
City
Nickname(s): Beantown USA
Motto: Where You Belong!
Location of Erie within County and State
Location of Erie within County and State
Coordinates: 37°34′7″N 95°14′33″W / 37.56861°N 95.24250°W / 37.56861; -95.24250Coordinates: 37°34′7″N 95°14′33″W / 37.56861°N 95.24250°W / 37.56861; -95.24250
Country United States
State Kansas
County Neosho
Founded 1866
Incorporated 1869
Government
 • Type Mayor-council
 • Mayor Darrell Bauer[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.21 sq mi (3.13 km2)
 • Land 1.21 sq mi (3.13 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 896 ft (273 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 1,150
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 1,124
 • Density 950.4/sq mi (367.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 66733
Area code(s) 620
FIPS code 20-21500[5]
GNIS feature ID 0475122[6]
Website ErieKS.com

Erie is a city in and the county seat of Neosho County, Kansas, United States,[7] and situated in the valley of the Neosho River, about a mile Northeast of the river. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 1,150.[8]

History[edit]

A settlement named "Erie," later referred to as "Old Erie" and "Beantown USA," was platted 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of the present townsite, while another community, known as "Crawfordsville," was started two miles southeast of the current site. In 1866, the proprietors of these two towns made a compromise to abandon the towns and start a new one. They selected the present townsite for the new location. In November of that year the Erie Town Company was formed consisting of D. W. Bray, Luther Packet, Peter Walters, and J. F. Hemilwright. Each member of this company donated forty acres of land in the center of Section 32, Township 28, Range 20 east.[9] Erie was named from a small lake nearby.[10]

Erie's first fire company was established in November 1866; its charter members were those men who had donated the land on which the community was built. The first log home in Erie was built in 1866, while the first businesses were built in the following year. By 1883, the city had two general stores, two blacksmith shops, one drug store, two hotels, one newspaper office, two churches, and a population of about 300.[9]

Erie was incorporated on December 25, 1869 with J. A. Wells, G. W. Dale, John McCullough, Isaac M. Fletcher and Douglas Putnam as trustees. On December 30, the trustees met and declared Erie to be a city of the 3rd class.[11]

In 1872, Erie was designated the county seat of Neosho County, defeating Osage Mission in a contentious election. After a lawsuit reached the Kansas Supreme Court, Erie retained the position of county seat.[9]

Geography[edit]

Erie is located at 37°34′7″N 95°14′33″W / 37.56861°N 95.24250°W / 37.56861; -95.24250 (37.568548, -95.242562)[12]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.21 square miles (3.13 km2), all of it land.[2]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Erie has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 1,276
2000 1,211 −5.1%
2010 1,150 −5.0%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,150 people, 463 households, and 312 families residing in the city. The population density was 950.4 inhabitants per square mile (367.0 /km2). There were 540 housing units at an average density of 446.3 per square mile (172.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.4% White, 0.3% African American, 1.1% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 1.3% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.6% of the population.

There were 463 households of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.6% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.89.

The median age in the city was 41.5 years. 24.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.5% were from 45 to 64; and 20.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.6% male and 50.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,211 people, 492 households, and 318 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,361.2 people per square mile (525.4/km²). There were 545 housing units at an average density of 612.6 per square mile (236.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.11% White, 0.17% African American, 0.91% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.74% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.82% of the population.

There were 492 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.3% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,568, and the median income for a family was $39,048. Males had a median income of $27,137 versus $18,672 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,019. About 9.1% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.5% of those under age 18 and 18.7% of those age 65 or over.

Extension service[edit]

On July 1, 2010, the Neosho County Extension Service joined with the Allen County Extension Service to form the Southwind Extension District, headquartered in Erie.[14] The Extension Service's mission is to help country residents with questions about their lawn and garden, crops and livestock, health and nutrition and family living. In addition the Extension Service sponsors youth development through the 4-H program. The Extension program is jointly administered by Kansas State University Research and Extension and the joint Extension Board, with members from both Neosho and Allen Counties.[15]

The Neosho County Fair, held at the fairgrounds in Erie, is also generally held around the third week of July. This includes entries from 4-H and FFA members and also open class entries from residents in the community.[16] The Neosho County Fair is operated by Neosho County Extension Service and the Neosho County Fair Association, a 501(c)(5) non-profit corporation founded in 1956.[17]

Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion[edit]

Erie is famous for its annual Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion held during the third week of July, including the annual Free Bean Feed. This reunion has been conducted continuously since 1873 and is claimed to be the oldest consecutively running Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion in the country.[18][19]

Salt pork and navy beans were a staple food for soldiers in the Civil War. So it was natural to serve kettles of beans during these reunions. Soon it became a tradition. Now over 1,400 pounds of beans are cooked in more than 50 iron kettles on the Courthouse lawn by the American Legion Post. Other events include the Rodeo held on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings during Reunion Week. The Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion culminates on Friday night when Mainstreet Memories brings in Country and Western Recording Artists from Nashville each year.[20]

Recipe for the Erie Bean Feed[21]
Ingredients
  • 1,400 pounds of Great Northern navy beans
  • 125 pounds of bacon
  • 50 pounds of onions
  • Water, as needed
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Preparation
  • At 7 am -- Hang 53 cast-iron kettles on cooking racks. Wash and divide beans among kettles. Add water and other ingredients.
  • At 11 am -- Ignite wood kindling underneath the kettles. Add wood as needed.
  • At 6 pm -- Serve and enjoy.

Education[edit]

The Unified School District 101 (USD 101) serves Erie, Galesburg, Stark, and rural Parsons in Neosho County.[22] On September 18, 2007 the district passed a $21.9 million bond issue. They built a new green high school in Erie which opened for classes in the Fall 2010 semester.[23][24] In addition, they have rebuilt the old high school into a grade school facility and added a new gym at Galesburg middle school. The mascot for Erie High School is the Red Devil. The mascot for Galesburg Middle School is the Timber Wolf.

The demolition of the old Erie Grade and Middle School brick building began in May 2013 and lasted into July, with the Amish assisting.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directory of Kansas Public Officials for Erie Kansas". Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c Cutler, William. "Neosho County, Part 3: Erie". History of the State of Kansas. A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL. Retrieved 9 July 2010. 
  10. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 251. 
  11. ^ "Neosho Country Planning Area Profile and Capabilities, City of Erie Overview". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  13. ^ Climate Summary for Erie, Kansas
  14. ^ "Neosho Country Extension Service". Retrieved 8 July 2010. 
  15. ^ "Kansas State University Research and Extension Division". Retrieved 8 July 2010. 
  16. ^ "Neosho County Fair". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  17. ^ "Urban Institute National Center for Charitable Statistics". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  18. ^ "Bean feed and veterans' reunion serves southeast Kansas town". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  19. ^ "Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  20. ^ "Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion Poster". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  21. ^ "136th Annual Old Soldiers and Sailors Reunion". Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  22. ^ http://www.usd101.com/. 
  23. ^ "Erie High School Construction". Retrieved 7 July 2010. 
  24. ^ "Interview with Allan Milbradt, Erie High School Architect". Retrieved 7 July 2010. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps