Count Erik of Rosenborg

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Prince Erik
Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg
Count Erik of Rosenborg.jpg
Spouse Lois Frances Booth
Issue Countess Alexandra
Count Christian
Full name
Erik Frederik Christian Alexander
House House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
Father Prince Valdemar of Denmark
Mother Princess Marie of Orléans
Born (1890-11-08)8 November 1890
Copenhagen, Denmark
Died 10 September 1950(1950-09-10) (aged 59)
Copenhagen, Denmark
Count Erik of Rosenborg in 1916

Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg (Erik Frederik Christian Alexander, 8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950) was a Danish and Icelandic prince. He was born in Copenhagen, a son of Prince Valdemar of Denmark and Princess Marie of Orléans.

Marriage and issue[edit]

As was then customary in the Danish royal house, Erik renounced his rights to the throne when he chose to take a commoner as wife, marrying in Ottawa, Ontario, on 11 February 1924 Lois Frances Booth (Ottawa, Ontario, 2 August 1897 – Copenhagen, 26 February 1941). With the king's permission, he took the title "Prince Erik Count of Rosenborg", and retained his right to the style of Highness, while forfeiting that of Royal Highness. His wife was the daughter of John Frederick Booth, who lived in Canada, and the paternal granddaughter of John Rudolphus Booth by his wife Rosalinda Cook,[1][2] from whom he was divorced in 1937. She later remarried Thorkild Juelsberg, without issue.

The couple had two children:

  • Alexandra Dagmar Frances Marie Margrethe, Countess of Rosenborg (Arcadia, Los Angeles County, California, 5 February 1927 – Odense, 5 October 1992), married in Copenhagen on 2 May 1951 to Ivar Emil Vind-Röj (Everdrup, 5 January 1921 – Odense, 11 February 1977), Master of the Royal Hunt, son of Ove Holger Christian Vind, Royal Danish Chamberlain, by his wife Elsa Mimi Adelaide Marie Oxholm (of Danish nobility),[3] and had three children:
    • Marie-Lovise Frances Elisabeth Vind (b. Hellerup, 7 February 1952), married at Allerup on 7 April 1973 and divorced Christian Count Knuth (b. Stenagegand, 23 November 1942), and had two children:
    • Erik Ove Carl Johan Emil Vind (b. Hellerup, 5 May 1954), married in Mahé, Seychelles on 15 February 1993 Suzanne Ingrid Jessie Dorthe Countess av Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (b. Svendborg, 4 March 1967), lady-in-waiting to the Princess Alexandra, and had three children:
      • Rosemarie Alexandra Kirsten Vind (b. Copenhagen, 2 November 1993)
      • Georg Ivar Emil Vind (b. Copenhagen, 15 October 1995)
      • Nonni Margaretha Elsa Vind (b. Odense, 14 June 2003)
    • Georg Christian Valdemar Vind (b. Hellerup, 5 August 1958), married in Kuwait on 19 September 1993 to Maria Munk (b. Frederiksberg, 12 October 1966), and had two children:
      • Andreas Ivar Knud Holger Vind (b. Kuwait, 26 November 1994)
      • Clara Alexandra Vind (b. 8 January 1998)
  • Christian Edward Valdemar Jean Frederik Peter, Count of Rosenborg (Bjergbygaard, 16 July 1932 – London, 24 March 1997), married at Stouby on 10 August 1962 Karin Lüttichau (b. Rohden, 12 August 1938), daughter of Folmer Lüttichau by his wife Ingeborg Carl, and had two children:
    • Valdemar Erik Flemming Christian, Count of Rosenborg (b. Skovshoved, 9 July 1965), married in Bordeaux on 29 June 1996 Charlotte Cruse (b. Cognac, 23 April 1967), and divorced in 2005, having had two children:
      • Nicolai Christian Valdemar, Count of Rosenborg (b. Gentofte, 6 November 1997)
      • Marie Geraldine Charlotte, Countess of Rosenborg (b. Copenhagen, 7 May 1999)
    • Marina Isabelle Ingeborg Karin, Countess of Rosenborg (b. Skovshoved, 28 March 1971).

Prince Erik died in Copenhagen in September 10, 1950.

Ancestors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 186.
  2. ^ http://www.twu.ca/sites/laurentian/heritage/jrbooth.html
  3. ^ Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, editor, Burke's Royal Families of the World, Volume 1: Europe & Latin America (London, U.K.: Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1977), page 70.

External links[edit]