Eryngium campestre

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Eryngium campestre
Eryngium campestre 310705b.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Eryngium
Species: E. campestre
Binomial name
Eryngium campestre
L.

Eryngium campestre, known as field eryngo,[1] is a species of Eryngium, which is used medicinally. A member of the Apiaceae family, Eryngo is a hairless, thorny perennial. The leaves are tough and stiff, whitish-green. The basal leaves are long-stalked, pinnate and spiny. The leafs of this plant are mined by the gall fly which is called Euleia heraclei.

Flowering season[edit]

July–September

Distribution[edit]

Mainly Central and southern Europe, north to Germany and Holland. Rare in the British Isles.

Uses[edit]

Used in herbalism as an infusion to treat coughs, whooping cough and urinary infections. Roots were formerly candied as sweets or boiled and roasted as a vegetable. Active Ingredients: Essential oils, saponins, tannins.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BSBI List 2007" (xls). Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 2014-10-17. 

External links[edit]

Erygium campestre in Russia in the vicinity of Saratov