Eskimo–Uralic languages

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Eskimo–Uralic
(obsolete)
Geographic
distribution:
Arctic coast
Subdivisions:
Glottolog: None

The Eskimo–Uralic hypothesis posits that the Uralic and Eskimo–Aleut language families belong to a common language family of which they are the two branches. Although substantial arguments for the hypothesis have been made, it is not generally accepted by linguists. The best-known advocate of the Eskimo–Uralic hypothesis is Knut Bergsland. The hypothesis dates back to the pioneering Danish linguist Rasmus Rask in 1818, upon noticing similarities between Greenlandic Eskimo and Finnish.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bergsland, Knut. 1959. "The Eskimo–Uralic hypothesis." Journal de la Societé finno-ougrienne 61, 1-29.
  • Seefloth, Uwe. 2000. "Die Entstehung polypersonaler Paradigmen im Uralo-Sibirischen." Zentralasiatische Studien 30, 163-191.

See also[edit]