Essex Fells, New Jersey

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Essex Fells, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Essex Fells
Map of Essex Fells in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Essex Fells in Essex County. Inset: Location of Essex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Essex Fells, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Essex Fells, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°49′41″N 74°16′34″W / 40.828127°N 74.276197°W / 40.828127; -74.276197Coordinates: 40°49′41″N 74°16′34″W / 40.828127°N 74.276197°W / 40.828127; -74.276197[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated March 31, 1902
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Edward P. Abbot (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Francine T. Paserchia[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.418 sq mi (3.673 km2)
 • Land 1.412 sq mi (3.657 km2)
 • Water 0.006 sq mi (0.015 km2)  0.42%
Area rank 458th of 566 in state
20th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 505 ft (154 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 2,113
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 2,119
 • Rank 484th of 566 in state
22nd of 22 in county[12]
 • Density 1,496.3/sq mi (577.7/km2)
 • Density rank 337th of 566 in state
21st of 22 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07021[13][14]
Area code(s) 973 exchanges: 226, 228, 264, 403, 618[15]
FIPS code 3401321840[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 2390558[18][2]
Website essexfellsboro.com

Essex Fells is a borough in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,113,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 49 (-2.3%) from the 2,162 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 23 (+1.1%) from the 2,139 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Essex Fells was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 31, 1902, from portions of Caldwell Township (now Fairfield Township).[20] In 1981, Essex Fells became a township to take advantage of federal revenue sharing policies.[21] Effective January 1, 1992, it again became a borough.[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Essex Fells as its 10th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

Geography[edit]

Essex Fells is located at 40°49′41″N 74°16′34″W / 40.828127°N 74.276197°W / 40.828127; -74.276197 (40.828127,-74.276197). According to the United States Census Bureau, Essex Fells borough had a total area of 1.418 square miles (3.673 km2), of which, 1.412 square miles (3.657 km2) of it was land and 0.006 square miles (0.015 km2) of it (0.42%) was water.[1][2]

Grover Cleveland Park, the seventh largest park in the Essex County park system, is a heavily wooded park covering 41.48 acres (167,900 m2) in the western section of the county along the Caldwell-Essex Fells border.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 442
1920 598 35.3%
1930 1,115 86.5%
1940 1,466 31.5%
1950 1,617 10.3%
1960 2,174 34.4%
1970 2,541 16.9%
1980 2,363 −7.0%
1990 2,139 −9.5%
2000 2,162 1.1%
2010 2,113 −2.3%
Est. 2013 2,119 [11] 0.3%
Population sources:
1910-1920[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,113 people, 728 households, and 597.7 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,496.3 per square mile (577.7 /km2). There were 758 housing units at an average density of 536.8 per square mile (207.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.56% (1,998) White, 1.09% (23) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 2.18% (46) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.24% (5) from other races, and 1.94% (41) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 1.99% (42) of the population.[7]

There were 728 households, of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.4% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.9% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.26.[7]

In the borough, 29.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 18.0% from 25 to 44, 31.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $182,031 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,894) and the median family income was $202,917 (+/- $46,038). Males had a median income of $120,417 (+/- $32,492) versus $72,500 (+/- $12,065) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $94,423 (+/- $11,353). About 0.9% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[30]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 2,162 people, 737 households, and 605 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,534.0 people per square mile (592.0/km2). There were 761 housing units at an average density of 540.0 per square mile (208.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.95% White, 0.46% African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population.[28][29]

There were 737 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.3% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.9% were non-families. 15.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.28.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.7% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $148,173, and the median income for a family was $175,000. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $52,266 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $77,434. About 0.3% of families and 1.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 0.6% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Essex Fells is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Essex Fells is Republican Edward P. Abbot, whose term of office ends December 31, 2013. Members of the Essex Fells Borough Council are Council President Patricia Wahl (R, 2013), Glen W. Koechling (R, 2015), John King (R, 2014), Jane McWilliams (R, 2013), George Peck (R, 2014) and William Sullivan (R, 2015).[31][32]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Essex Fells is located in the 11th Congressional District[33] and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district.[8][34][35]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[36] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[37][38] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[39][40]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange).[41][42] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[43] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[44]

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders.[45] As of 2014, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr.[46] The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end December 31, 2014.[45][47][48] Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark)[49], Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston)[50], Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark)[51], Gerald W. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.)[52] Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark)[53], D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington)[54], Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange)[55] and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell),[56] and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair).[57][58][59] Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015),[60] Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015)[61] and Surrogate Theodore N. Stephens, II (2016).[62][47][63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,696 registered voters in Essex Fells, of which 347 (20.5%) were registered as Democrats, 847 (49.9%) were registered as Republicans and 499 (29.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 64.6% of the vote here (829 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 34.1% (437 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (11 votes), among the 1,283 ballots cast by the borough's 1,661 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.2%.[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 68.8% of the vote here (900 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 29.9% (392 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (15 votes), among the 1,309 ballots cast by the borough's 1,621 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 80.8.[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.5% of the vote here (688 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 22.3% (224 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.9% (79 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (5 votes), among the 1,005 ballots cast by the borough's 1,682 registered voters, yielding a 59.8% turnout.[67]

On a local level, Essex Fells has elected a Republican mayor in every vote held since becoming a borough in 1902.[68]

Education[edit]

The Essex Fells School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade. Essex Fells School had an enrollment of 242 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[69]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the West Essex Regional School District, a regional school district serving students from four municipalities in western Essex County. Communities served by the district's schools are Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell and Roseland.[70][71] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[72]) are West Essex Regional Middle School[73] (grades 7-8; 564 students) and West Essex High School[74] (grades 9-12; 1,025 students).[75]

History[edit]

Essex Fells was part of the Horseneck Tract, which was an area that consisted of what are now the municipalities of Caldwell, West Caldwell, North Caldwell, Fairfield, Verona, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Roseland, and portions of Livingston and West Orange.

In 1702, settlers purchased the 14,000 acres (57 km2) Horseneck Tract — so-called because of its irregular shape that suggested a horse's neck and head — from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans for goods equal to $325. This purchase encompassed much of western Essex County, from the Orange, or First Mountain in the Watchung Mountain range to the Passaic River.[68]

In the late 1800s, Philadelphia developer Anthony S. Drexel realized the impact of train travel on residential development and sent Charles W. Leavitt to the northern New Jersey area near the end of the Caldwell line. Leavitt, Drexel and Drexel's son-in-law John F. Fell formed the Suburban Land Company and purchased 1,000 acres of land from the estate of Revolutionary War General William J. Gould. In order to create their residential development the group commissioned noted architect Ernest W. Bowditch. The community's name was derived by taking "Essex" from the name of the county and adding "Fells" from the name of John F. Fell which also means hill or down.[76]

Based on an ordinance passed in 1928, commercial activity in the borough is limited to a single three-story building constructed to look like a house and two small workshops on a dead end. As of 2000, Essex Fells had 750 houses, most of which were custom built, with many occupying lots several acres in size. The borough has no apartment buildings, condos, office buildings or traffic lights. The only units available for rental are in carriage houses and other ancillary structures.[68]

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides service in the borough to and from Newark on the 29 and 71 routes.[77]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Essex Fells include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator/Clerk, Borough of Essex Fells. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 125.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Essex Fells, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Essex Fells borough, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Essex Fells borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Populations for Essex County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Essex Fells, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Essex Fells, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 127. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  21. ^ New Jersey State Commission on County and Municipal Government, Modern Forms of Municipal Government, 1992, Chapter VI: Municipal Names and Municipal Classification
  22. ^ U.S. Census Bureau, 1990s boundary changes: New Jersey, accessed June 2008
  23. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  24. ^ Grover Cleveland Park, Essex County, New Jersey Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Essex Fells borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Essex Fells borough, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Essex Fells borough, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  31. ^ Officials, Borough of Essex Fells. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Municipal Officials in Essex County As of January 2012, Essex County, New Jersey, page 3. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  33. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  37. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  39. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  40. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  42. ^ District 27 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  43. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ a b General Information, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014. "The Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, five of whom are elected from districts and four of whom are elected at-large. They are elected for three-year concurrent terms and may be re-elected to successive terms at the annual election in November."
  46. ^ Essex County Executive, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  47. ^ a b Essex County Elected Officials, Essex County Clerk, as of February 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  48. ^ Definition of a Freeholder, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  49. ^ Blonnie R. Watson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  50. ^ Patricia Sebold, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  51. ^ Rufus I. Johnson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  52. ^ Lee, Eunice. "Labor leader from South Orange tapped as new Essex County freeholder", The Star-Ledger, December 19, 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014. "A longtime labor union leader from South Orange was sworn in this afternoon as the newest Essex County freeholder.Gerald Owens, 74, is a general organizer for the International Longshoremen's Association.... Owens is filling the seat vacated by former at-large freeholder Donald Payne Jr., who stepped down from the post last month after securing the 10th Congressional District seat left open by his late father."
  53. ^ Rolando Bobadilla, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  54. ^ D. Bilal Beasley, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  55. ^ Carol Y. Clark, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  56. ^ Leonard M. Luciano, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  57. ^ Brendan W. Gill, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  58. ^ The Board of Chosen Freeholders, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  59. ^ Breakdown of Freeholder Districts, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  60. ^ About Christopher J. Durkin, Essex County Clerk. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  61. ^ Armando B. Fontoura - Essex County Sheriff, Essex County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  62. ^ Office of Surrogate, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  63. ^ County Directory, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  64. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Essex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Essex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  68. ^ a b c d Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Essex Fells, N.J.; No Stores and No Apartments, by Law", The New York Times, May 28, 2000. Accessed June 28, 2009. "During the skating season, Scott Stevens, the New Jersey Devils captain, who lives in Essex Fells, can be seen skating on the pond."
  69. ^ Data for the Essex Fells School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  70. ^ West Essex Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 10, 2013. "West Essex Regional High School is located in North Caldwell and serves the four area sending districts of Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell, and Roseland."
  71. ^ Home page, West Essex Regional School District, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 24, 2011. Accessed October 10, 2013. "The West Essex Regional School District is proud to celebrate 50 years of providing excellent educational opportunities for the students of Fairfield, Essex Fells, North Caldwell and Roseland. West Essex will be coordinating efforts to celebrate this golden anniversary as we move through 2011."
  72. ^ School Data for the West Essex Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  73. ^ West Essex Regional Middle School, West Essex Regional School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  74. ^ West Essex Regional High School, West Essex Regional School District. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  75. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the West Essex Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  76. ^ Poekel Jr., Charles A. http://books.google.com/books?id=PowJpByf68IC&pg=PA9 West Essex: Essex Fells, Fairfield, North Caldwell, and Roseland], p. 9., Arcadia Publishing, 1999. ISBN 9780738501413. Accessed October 10, 2013.
  77. ^ Essex County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed March 10, 2012.
  78. ^ Fensom, Michael J. "More new stadiums: New Jersey sports in 2010", The Star-Ledger, December 30, 2009. Accessed May 8, 2012. "Accompanying Howard to the competition in South Africa will be national team coach and Essex Fells native Bob Bradley, along with his son, Michael, from Princeton, and Livingston’s Jozy Altidore."
  79. ^ Lurie, Maxine N.; and Mappen, Marc. Contributing author Charles A. Poekel Jr. "Willis Haviland Carrier", Encyclopedia of New Jersey, p. 123. Rutgers University Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8135-3325-2. Accessed January 9, 2010.
  80. ^ Don Criqui, CBS Sports. Accessed May 8, 2012. "He was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and lives with his wife, Molly, in Essex Fells, N.J."
  81. ^ Ian Eagle, CBS Sports. Accessed November 9, 2012. "A 1990 graduate of Syracuse University, Eagle was the play-by-play voice of the Orangemen for football, basketball and lacrosse, and was awarded the Bob Costas Award for Outstanding Sportscasting. He lives in Essex Fells, N.J., with his wife, Alisa, and two children."
  82. ^ via Associated Press. "Connie Francis is Bride", The New York Times, January 17, 1971. Accessed September 28, 2012. "The wedding took place at St. Aloysius Church and was followed by a reception at the bride's home in Essex Fells."
  83. ^ D'Amato, Gary. "TURIN WINTER GAMES WISCONSIN CONNECTION", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, February 9, 2006. Accessed June 2, 2013. "BRIAN RAFALSKI Sport: Hockey. Age: 32. Wisconsin tie: Attended Wisconsin. Residence: Essex Fells, NJ"
  84. ^ Poekel, Charlie. Babe & the Kid: The Legendary Story of Babe Ruth and Johnny Sylvester, The History Press, 2007, ISBN 1596292679. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  85. ^ Thomas, Robert McG., Jr. "Johnny Sylvester, the Inspiration For Babe Ruth Heroics, Is Dead", The New York Times, January 11, 1990. Accessed September 28, 2012. "According to his son, John D. Sylvester Jr., and at least one contemporary account, the ailment was an infection of the forehead caused by a kick from a horse after the youngster fell while riding, in Essex Fells, N.J. His father, Horace C. Sylvester Jr., a vice president of the National City Bank in New York, maintained an estate there."
  86. ^ Board of Directors, Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. Accessed September 28, 2012. "John C. Whitehead was born in Evanston, Illinois. He grew up in Montclair, New Jersey, attended public schools there and graduated from Montclair High School. He lived in nearby Essex Fells until 1985 and has resided in Manhattan since 1989."

External links[edit]