Estonian Institute

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Estonian Institute
Eesti Instituut logo.JPG
Founded 1989
Founder Government of Estonia
Type Cultural institution
Area served
Worldwide
Product Estonian cultural education

The Estonian Institute is a non-governmental and non-profit organisation aiming to promote Estonian culture abroad. The institute was founded in 1989 as a shadow foreign office for the Estonian independence movement by Lennart Meri, later the first foreign minister and first president of Estonia after the Soviet occupation. Current director of the institute is the son of the president, philologist and Finno-Ugric specialist Mart Meri.

Activities[edit]

The task of the Estonian Institute is to spread information about Estonian society and culture in other countries, further cultural and educational links and organise the teaching of Estonian language and culture outside Estonia.

Over the years the Institute has published dozens of information booklets and periodicals about Estonia, compiled web pages, organised festivals, exhibitions, conferences and seminars, received journalists, researchers and lecturers, translators and writers, opened culture and information centres in other countries, granted scholarships, despatched lecturers of Estonian language and culture to universities abroad and supplied the study centres with relevant material.

Presently, the Estonian Institute's main areas of activity are publishing diverse brochures, organising cultural events abroad and maintaining several web sites, which include the online encyclopaedia Estonica and the Estonian cultural events calendar Culture.ee. The Estonian Institute also organises conferences, festivals, exhibitions and seminars about Estonian culture, replies to Estonia-related queries, and receives translators, journalists, researchers, writers, and lecturers.

Publications[edit]

Locations[edit]

The Estonian Institute has offices abroad located in Helsinki (since 1995)], Stockholm (since 1999)]and Budapest (since 1998)]. The main office is in Tallinn.

External links[edit]