Estonian euro coins

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An Estonian euro starter kit

Estonian euro coins feature a single design for all eight coins. This is a design by Lembit Lõhmus and features a silhouette map of Estonia together with the word Eesti (Estonia) and twelve stars, symbolic of the European Union, surrounding the map. This was the winning design in a public vote of ten announced in December 2004.

Estonian euro coins entered circulation on 1 January 2011. Estonia is the fifth of ten states that joined the EU in 2004, and the first ex-Soviet republic, to join the eurozone. Of the ten new member states, Estonia was the first to unveil its design. It originally planned to adopt the euro on 1 January 2007; however, it did not formally apply when Slovenia did, and officially changed its target date to 1 January 2008, and later, to 1 January 2011.[1] On 12 May 2010 the European Commission announced that Estonia had met all criteria to join the eurozone.[2] On 8 June 2010, the EU finance ministers agreed that Estonia would be able to join the euro on 1 January 2011.[3] On 13 July 2010, Estonia received the final approval from the ECOFIN to adopt the euro as from 1 January 2011. On the same date the exchange rate at which the kroon would be exchanged for the euro (€1 = 15.6466 krooni) was also announced. On 20 July 2010, mass production of Estonian euro coins began in the mint of Finland.[4] 2012 coins were produced by Royal Dutch Mint winning the production bid.

Estonian euro design[edit]

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins. A design competition was held for the design of the Estonian euro coins.[5] 134 designs were submitted to the competition.

Depiction of Estonian euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
Silhouette of Estonia
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Silhouette of Estonia
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
Estonian 2 euro coin edge (condensed).svg "O" and "E E S T I" repeated alternately upright and inverted.[6]
Relief silhouette of Estonia

Circulating mintage quantities[edit]

Face Value[7] €0.01 €0.02 €0.05 €0.10 €0.20 €0.50 €1.00 €2.00 €2.00 CC Total
2011 32,000,000 30,000,000 30,000,000 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 16,000,000 11,000,000 * 194,000,000[8]
2012 25,000,000 25,000,000 * * * * * * 2,000,000 52,000,000[9]
2013 * * * * * * * * * 0[10]

* No coins were minted that year for that denomination
** Data not available yet
*** Small quantities minted for sets only

Design controversy[edit]

Ethnic Setos have protested the design of the coin, claiming that the outline of the map of Estonia does not include the former south eastern region of Estonia that constituted a part of the Seto homeland annexed by Stalin during the occupation of the Baltic states.[11] On the other hand, a Russian lawyer Sergei Seredenko claimed that the outline included Russian controlled areas.[12] The Russian embassy was prompted to issue a statement that the euro coins do indeed depict the current borders of the country's territory.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alcohol and tobacco tax to rise in Estonia next year". Helsingin Sanomat. 25 May 2007. Retrieved 1 January 2009. 
  2. ^ "Estonia ready for euro". European Commission. 12 May 2010. Retrieved 12 May 2010. 
  3. ^ Estonia to Join Euro 1 January 2011
  4. ^ http://eurocollection.ning.com/
  5. ^ National Bank of Estonia, estonian-euro.com
  6. ^ http://myeurohobby.eu/
  7. ^ "Production of the Estonian euro coins". Bank of Estonia. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  8. ^ "Eesti euromünte vermitakse Soomes 194 miljonit tükki". EPL. Retrieved 2010-12-30. 
  9. ^ "Eesti Pank laseb käibele 2012. aasta 1- ja 2-sendised mündid". BoE. Retrieved 2012-05-02. 
  10. ^ "Mintage quantities of the euro coins and official euro collector folders". BoE. Retrieved 2014-07-06. 
  11. ^ "Setos Protest Truncated Map of Estonia". Estonian Public Broadcasting News. 04.01.2011. Retrieved 8 January 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  12. ^ http://www.numismaster.com/ta/numis/Article.jsp?ad=article&ArticleId=17797
  13. ^ "Another Side to the Euro Coin Map Dispute". Estonian Public Broadcasting News. 07.01.2011. Retrieved 8 January 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links[edit]