Estonian parliamentary election, 2011

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Estonian parliamentary election, 2011
Estonia
2007 ←
6 March 2011
→ 2015

101 seats in the Riigikogu
51 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party
  Ansip, Andrus (2007) crop.jpg Edgar Savisaar 2005.jpg
Leader Andrus Ansip Edgar Savisaar
Party Reform Party Centre Party
Last election 31 seats 29 seats
Seats won 33 26
Seat change +2 −3
Popular vote 164,255 134,124
Percentage 28.6% 23.3%

  Third party Fourth party
  MartLaar2007.jpg Mikser sven.jpg
Leader Mart Laar Sven Mikser
Party Pro Patria & Res Publica Social Democrats
Last election 19 seats 10 seats
Seats won 23 19
Seat change +4 +9
Popular vote 118,023 98,307
Percentage 20.5% 17.1%

Prime Minister before election

Andrus Ansip
Reform Party

Elected Prime Minister

Andrus Ansip
Reform Party

Coat of arms of Estonia.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Estonia

A parliamentary election was held in Estonia on 6 March 2011, with e-voting between 24 February and 2 March 2011.

The 101 members of the Riigikogu (Parliament of Estonia) were elected using a form of proportional representation for a four-year term. The seats were allocated using a modified D'Hondt method. The country is divided into twelve multi-mandate electoral districts. There is a nationwide threshold of 5% for party lists, but if the number of votes cast for a candidate exceeds or equals the simple quota (which shall be obtained by dividing the number of valid votes cast in the electoral district by the number of mandates in the district) he or she is elected.

Pre-election polls put the Reform Party, led by Prime Minister Andrus Ansip, ahead of its main rival, the opposition Centre Party. The former is right of centre, the latter is considered populist, slightly to the left on economic matters. Both parties are members of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party.

The election was marked by the highest number of running independents (32) since 1992. Several independent candidates were members of the Estonian Patriotic Movement.[1]

Seats by electoral district[edit]

The district number Electoral District Seats
1 Haabersti, Põhja-Tallinn and Kristiine districts in Tallinn 9
2 Kesklinn, Lasnamäe and Pirita districts in Tallinn 11
3 Mustamäe and Nõmme districts in Tallinn 8
4 Harjumaa (without Tallinn) and Raplamaa counties 14
5 Hiiumaa, Läänemaa and Saaremaa counties 6
6 Lääne-Virumaa county 5
7 Ida-Virumaa county 8
8 Järvamaa and Viljandimaa counties 8
9 Jõgevamaa and Tartumaa counties (without Tartu) 7
10 Tartu city 8
11 Võrumaa, Valgamaa and Põlvamaa counties 9
12 Pärnumaa county 8

Opinion polling[edit]

Party PM candidate Seats after
2007 elections
Rating
Estonian Reform Party Andrus Ansip 31 43% (November 2010, Estonia),[2]
33% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
36% (December 2010),[3]
36% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
25% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute),[4]
39% (13 February 2011),[5]
28% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
Estonian Centre Party Edgar Savisaar 29 23% (November 2010, Estonia),[2]
31% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
23% (December 2010),[3]
23% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
19% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute),[4]
25% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
Union of Pro Patria and Res Publica Mart Laar 19 15% (November 2010, Estonia),[2]
20% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
15% (December 2010),[3]
16% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
12% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute),[4]
21% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
Social Democratic Party Sven Mikser 10 11% (November 2010, Estonia),[3]
9% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
13% (December 2010),[3]
14% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
9% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute)[4]
16% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
Estonian Greens Aleksei Lotman 6 3% (November 2010, Estonia),[3]
4% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
5% (December 2010),[3]
4% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
2% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute)[4]
4% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
People's Union of Estonia Andrus Blok 6 2% (November 2010, Estonia),[3]
1% (November 2010, Tallinn),[2]
4% (December 2010),[3]
2% (January 2011, TNS Emor),[3]
2% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute)[4]
2% (25 February 2011, TNS Emor)[6]
Party of Estonian Christian Democrats Peeter Võsu 0
Estonian Independence Party Vello Leito 0
Russian Party in Estonia Dimitri Klenski 0
Non-party candidates 0 9% (January 2011, Turu-Uuringute)[7]

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Estonian Reform Party 164,255 28.6 33 +2
Estonian Centre Party 134,124 23.3 26 –3
Pro Patria and Res Publica Union 118,023 20.5 23 +4
Social Democratic Party 98,307 17.1 19 +9
Estonian Greens 21,824 3.8 0 –6
People's Union of Estonia 12,184 2.1 0 –6
Russian Party in Estonia 5,029 0.9 0 0
Party of Estonian Christian Democrats 2,934 0.5 0 0
Estonian Independence Party 2,571 0.4 0 0
Independents 15,882 2.8 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 5,131
Total 580,264 100 101 0
Registered voters/turnout 913,346 63.5
Source: VVK

Report on Internet voting[edit]

The Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe observed this election and issued a report with a number of recommendations.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]