Ethel Smith (organist)

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Ethel Smith
Born Ethel Goldsmith
(1902-11-22)November 22, 1902
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died May 10, 1996(1996-05-10) (aged 93)
Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.
Years active c.1925–1993
Spouse(s) Mr. Spiro (m. <1940)
Ralph Bellamy (m. 1945–47)
Children none
Parents Elizabeth Bober
Max Goldsmith

Ethel Smith (November 22, 1902[1][2] – May 10, 1996) was an organist who played primarily in a pop style on the Hammond organ.

Her recording of "Tico Tico" was her best-known hit. It reached No. 14 on the U.S. pop charts in November 1944 and sold over one million copies worldwide.[citation needed] She also performed it in the 1944 film, Bathing Beauty. She was married to Ralph Bellamy from 1945 to 1947.[3] She died on May 10, 1996.[4]

Selected discography[edit]

78s[edit]

  • Teddy Bear's Picnic/Fiddle-Faddle,Decca 60.298 American Series(very rare)
  • Tico Tico, Decca 23353
  • Tico Tico/Lere Lero, Decca BM03571 American Series
  • White Christmas/Jingle Bells, Decca BM30601 American Series
  • Paran pan pin - Cachita/The parrot, Decca BM03632 American Series
  • Quizas, quizas, quizas/Made for each other, Decca 60.139 American Series
  • Blame it on the samba/The green cockatoo, Decca 60.249 American Series
  • Mambo Jambo, Decca 27119
  • Monkey on a string, Decca 27183
  • I'm walking behind you/April in Portugal, Brunswick 05147
  • Ethel's birthday party/The wedding of the painted doll, Decca 60.605

LPs[edit]

  • Ethel Smith's Hit Party, Decca DL 4803
  • Souvenir Album, Decca DL 5016
  • Ethel Smith's Cha Cha Cha Album, Decca DL 8164
  • Christmas Music, Decca DL 8187
  • Galloping Fingers, Decca DL 8456
  • Latin From Manhattan, Decca DL 8457
  • Miss Smith Goes To Paris, Decca DL 8640
  • Dance To The Latin Rhythm's Of Ethel Smith, Decca DL 8712
  • Waltz With Me, Decca DL 8735
  • Lady Fingers, Decca DL 8744
  • Bright And Breezy, Decca DL 8799
  • Ethel Smith Swings Sweetly, Decca DL 74095
  • The Many Moods Of Ethel Smith, Decca DL 74145
  • Make Mine Hawaiian, Decca DL 74236
  • Lady of Spain, Decca DL 74325[5]
  • Rhythm Antics!, Decca DL 74414
  • At The End Of A Perfect Day, Decca DL 74467
  • Hollywood Favorites, Decca DL 74618
  • Ethel Smith's Hit Party, Decca DL 74803
  • Seated One Day At The Organ, Decca DL 78902
  • Bouquet Of The Blues, Decca DL 78955
  • Ethel Smith On Broadway, Decca DL 78993
  • Ethel Smith, Vocalion VL 3669
  • Organ Holiday, Vocalion VL 73778
  • Silent Night—Holy Night, Vocalion VL 73882
  • Parade, MCA Coral CB 20021

CDs[edit]

  • Tico Tico, Living Era AJA-5506 (2004). A compilation of early releases from 1944-1952
  • The Fabulous Organ Music of Ethel Smith, MCA MSD-35255 (out of print as of December 2005)
  • The First Lady of the Hammond Organ: Plays "Tico Tico" & Other Great Recordings, Jasmine Music (2003). A 2-CD compilation of early recordings

Music books[edit]

  • The Ethel Smith Hammond Organ Method Book One, Revised Edition, Copyright 1949 and 1964 By Ethel Smith Music Corp. New York, NY. For use on every Hammond Organ including all Spinet Models.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Social Security Death Index". Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  2. ^ Matthew Brown; Elizabeth Galand (2000). "Ethel Smith: Weird Organ Lady or Mongo Organista?". Cool and Strange Music! (18): 16–19. Retrieved July 1, 2014. "Although she publicly gave her birthdate as November 22, 1910, she was actually born in 1902" 
  3. ^ "Married". Time (magazine). September 10, 1945. Retrieved 2008-06-17. "Ralph Bellamy, 41, veteran stage (Tomorrow the World) and screen (Guest in the House) actor; and Ethel Smith, 32, thin, Tico-Tico-famed cinema electric organist (Bathing Beauty); he for the third time, she for the second; in Harrison, N.Y." 
  4. ^ "Ethel Smith, radio and film organist, dies". Cox News Service. May 18, 1996. "Ethel Smith, a professional organist whose music enlivened the beat on radio's Lucky Strike Hit Parade and Carmen Miranda films, died in Palm Beach Friday. She was 93." 
  5. ^ "Album Reviews". Billboard. January 26, 1963. p. 37. Retrieved May 1, 2013.