Ethnic press in Baltimore

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The Ethnic press in Baltimore, Maryland is press fashioned with a particular ethnic minority group or community in mind, including the non-English language press. While English language newspapers have always served the general population, many of Baltimore's ethnic immigrant communities have had newspapers published in their native languages.

African-American[edit]

Belarusian-American[edit]

Czech-American[edit]

  • Baltimorské Listy (Baltimore Letters), a Czech language newspaper published in Baltimore and Chicago.
  • Telegraf, a local weekly newspaper published in the Czech language, running for 42 years from February 20, 1909 until 1951.[6]

Estonian-American[edit]

  • Baltimore Eesti Organisatsioonide bülletään (Baltimore Estonian Organization Bulletin), an Estonian language periodical published in Baltimore since 1965.[7]

German-American[edit]

  • Katholische Volkszeitung: Ein Wochenblatt im Interesse der Kirche (Catholic People's Daily: A Weekly Paper in the Interest of the Church), a German language Roman Catholic newspaper.
  • Sinai, a German-Jewish periodical devoted to the interests of radical reform.[9]

Hispanic and Latino-American[edit]

Italian-American[edit]

  • The Italian Journal, an Italian-American newspaper published in English and Italian.

Jewish American[edit]

  • Baltimore Jewish Times, Baltimore's oldest and largest Jewish publication,[11] it has been described as "the largest weekly in Maryland and one of the most respected independent Jewish publications in America",[12] and "one of the premier independent Jewish newspapers in the country." [13]
  • Jewish Comment, a Jewish newspaper published in 1895.[9]
  • Sinai, a German-Jewish periodical devoted to the interests of radical reform.[9]
  • The Jewish Chronicle, a Jewish newspaper published from 1875 to 1877.[9]
  • The News Exchange, a bilingual Russian-English newspaper created to facilitate the integration of Russian-Jewish immigrants into American society, established in May, 1978, by the Baltimore branch of the HIAS.[14][15]
  • Where What When, a monthly Jewish periodical established in 1985, its content is directed to the wide spectrum of Baltimore's Jewish population, and it has an approximate readership of 40,000.[11]

Lithuanian-American[edit]

Polish-American[edit]

  • Friends of the Hearth, an early Polish language newspaper geared toward Baltimore Polonia.[16]
  • Polish Times, a Polish-American newspaper.

Russian-American[edit]

  • The News Exchange, a bilingual Russian-English newspaper created to facilitate the integration of Russian-Jewish immigrants into American society, established in May, 1978, by the Baltimore branch of the HIAS.[14][15]
  • Poleznai︠a︡ gazeta / Poleznaya gazeta, a Russian language newspaper published in Baltimore, Brooklyn, and Pennsylvania.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Baltimore City Newspapers". Johns Hopkins University Library. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  2. ^ Farrar, Hayward (1998-05-30). The Baltimore Afro-American: 1892-1950. Greenwood Press. p. 240. ISBN 0-313-30517-X. 
  3. ^ a b c "A Way To 'Defend Our Culture'". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2014-07-09. 
  4. ^ a b c "`I feel myself at home here'". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2014-07-09. 
  5. ^ "Rokos Family Czech-American Collection - PP145". Maryland Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  6. ^ "Guide to Maryland Newspapers - MSA SC 3774 [OCLC 9483768]". Archives of Maryland Online. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  7. ^ "Baltimore Eesti Selts (Baltimore Estonian Society), Records". University of Minnesota. Retrieved 2014-07-09. 
  8. ^ "Preserving a part of the city's German past". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h "Baltimore". Jewish Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2014-07-08. 
  10. ^ Blanca Torres (May 24, 2005). "A bilingual newspaper looks to provide Baltimore Latinos with information on Hispanic culture and the issues affecting them.". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  11. ^ a b About Us, Baltimore Jewish Times website. Retrieved December 28, 2012.
  12. ^ Echo Media - Baltimore Jewish Times. Retrieved July 12, 2006.
  13. ^ David, Michael. Publisher of 6 Jewish weeklies, Charles Buerger, dies at 58, j., November 15, 1996.
  14. ^ a b Waxman, Chaim Isaac (1983). America's Jews in Transition. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press. p. 194. ISBN 0-877-22321-1. Retrieved July 8, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b Wikisource-logo.svg Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John, eds. (1900). "Einhorn, David". Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography. New York: D. Appleton. 
  16. ^ "Newspaper Abstracts". Historyk Press. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Farrar, Hayward. The Baltimore Afro-American, 1892-1950, Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1998.
  • Keidel, George C. The earliest German newspapers of Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Priv. Print., 1927.