Eugene E. Covert

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Eugene Edzards Covert[1] (born February 6, 1926) was an aeronautics specialist born in Rapid City, South Dakota[2][3] credited with the world's first practical wind tunnel magnetic suspension system, and was a member of the Rogers Commission. In the 1970s he was the chief scientist of the US Air Force and technical director of the European Office of Aerospace Research and Development.[4]

In 2005 it was announced that he would receive the Daniel Guggenheim Medal for aviation.[5]

Covert graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1946 and received a Masters in Aeronautical Engineering in 1948. In 1958, he received a doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[6] Covert received a number of awards and citations, including the Exceptional Civilian Service Award from the United States Air Force (1973, 1976), the University Educator of the Year, Engineering Science Division, American Society of Aerospace Education, National Aeronautic Association (1980), the NASA Public Service Award (1981), the MIT Graduate Student Council Outstanding Teacher Aware (1985), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Ground Testing Aware (1990), the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development von Karman Medal (1990), and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics W. F. Durand Lectureship (1992).[7] He also received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the University of Minnesota in 2007.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Eugene Edzards Covert" (pdf). Biographical Data Sheet. NASA Johnson Space Center. 1998-08-12. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Appointment of 12 Members of the Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident, and Designation of the Chairman and Vice Chairman". Archives. Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. 1986-02-03. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  4. ^ "Covert to receive one of aviation's highest awards". News. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2005-11-04. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  5. ^ Litant, William T.G. (2006). "An appreciation: Gene Covert and the Guggenheim Meda;". Aero-Astro magazine. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  6. ^ "AEM alumnus honored with Outstanding Achievement Award". Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics - AEM Spotlight. University of Minnesota. 2007-07-24. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  7. ^ "EEC_BIO for Eugene Covert". NASA. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  8. ^ "AEM alumnus honored with Outstanding Achievement Award". Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics - AEM Spotlight. University of Minnesota. 2007-07-24. Retrieved 2009-01-12.