Euna Lee

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Euna Lee
Born 이승은 (Lee Seung-un)
1972 (age 41–42)[1]
South Korea
Nationality American
Ethnicity Korean
Occupation Journalist
Notable credit(s) Current TV
Spouse(s) Michael Saldate
Children Hana Saldate

Euna Lee (Hangul:유나 리) is a South Korean-born American journalist who has worked for Current TV since 2005.[2] Lee and fellow journalist Laura Ling were detained in North Korea after they crossed into the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the People's Republic of China without a visa. The United States Government protested the sentences, and implemented diplomatic efforts in order to secure the release of both Lee and Ling.[3] On 4 August 2009 Lee and Ling were pardoned by the North Korean government after a special humanitarian visit by former US President Bill Clinton.

Lee was born and raised in South Korea, and moved to the United States in order to attend Academy of Art University, where she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film and Broadcasting. She currently attends the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.[4] She is married to actor Michael Saldate; they have a daughter, Hana.[5]

On 4 August 2009, former US President Bill Clinton visited North Korea in an attempt to free Lee and fellow journalist Laura Ling. The North Korean government pardoned both Lee and Ling after meeting with Clinton that day.[6][7] Human rights activists in South Korea accuse Lee and Ling of placing North Korean refugees in danger through their actions.[8]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "H.Res.555 – Expressing concern for the well-being of journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee and urging the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to release them on humanitarian grounds.". United States Congress. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  2. ^ "Euna Lee resume". Act-edit.com. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  3. ^ Bosland, Katie; Netter, Sarah; Hinman, Katie (8 June 2009). "U.S. Fighting North Korea Labor Camp Sentence for Laura Ling, Euna Lee". ABC News. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  4. ^ Horgan, Richard (5 July 2011). "Euna Lee Heads to Columbia Journalism School". FishbowlLA. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  5. ^ Abdulrahim, Raja; Garrison, Jessica (11 June 2009). "Friends speak up for L.A. journalists held by N. Korea". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  6. ^ "N. Korean leader reportedly pardons U.S. journalists". CNN. 4 August 2009. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  7. ^ "North Korea: 2 US journalists pardoned". Google news. Associated Press. 4 August 2009. Retrieved 5 August 2009. 
  8. ^ Choe, Sang-hun (22 August 2009). "In South Korea, Freed U.S. Journalists Come Under Harsh Criticism". The New York Times. Retrieved 24 August 2009. 

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