Eunicus

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Eunicus (Ancient Greek: Εὔνικος) is the name of two different people in Classical history:

  • Eunicus, an Athenian comic poet of the Old Comedy, contemporary with Aristophanes and Philyllius. Only one line of his is preserved, from his play Anteia (Ἄντεια), which was also attributed to Philyllius. The title is taken from the courtesan, Anteia, who is mentioned by Demosthenes[1] and Anaxandrides[2] and who was also made the subject of comedies by Alexis and Antiphanes. There was also a comedy, entitled Poleis (Πόλεις) which was variously ascribed to Aristophanes, Philyllius, and Eunicus.[3][4][5][6][7] The Suda mentions an "Aenicus" (Αἴνικος) as the author of a play called Anteia, although this is probably the same person.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ c. Neaer. p. 1351
  2. ^ ap. Athen. xv. p. 570, e
  3. ^ a b Smith, Philip (1867), "Eunicus (1) and (2)", in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology 2, p. 94 
  4. ^ Theognostus, ap. Bekker. Anecdot. p. 1369
  5. ^ Pollux, x. 100
  6. ^ Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. vol. i. pp. 249, 250, vol. ii. p. 856
  7. ^ Fabric. Bibl. Graec. voL ii. p. 444
  8. ^ Smith, William (1867), "Aenete", in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology 1, p. 34 
  9. ^ Suda, s.v. Αἴνικος
  10. ^ Plin. xxxiii. 12. s. 55; xxxiv. 8. s. 19. § 25

Sources[edit]