Euphemia Stewart, Countess of Strathearn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Euphemia Stewart, Countess of Strathearn (died c. 1434) was a medieval Scottish noblewoman, the daughter of David Stewart, Earl Palatine of Strathearn and Caithness. She succeeded to both her father's titles after his death between 1385 and 1389, probably March 1386.

Inheritance and marriages[edit]

Euphemia was born on an unknown date in Scotland, the daughter of David Stewart, Earl Palantine of Strathearn and Caithness. Her mother was the sister of David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford, however her first name is not known. As an only child she was heiress to her father's earldoms. In about March 1386 her father died and she became suo jure Countess of Strathearn and Caithness. Calling herself Countess Palatine of Strathearn, she resigned the title Earl of Caithness to her uncle Walter Stewart, Earl of Atholl, sometime before 1402.

She was married to Patrick Graham, son of Sir Patrick Graham of Dundaff. They had issue:

.

Patrick Graham appears to have taken the designation of Earl of Strathearn, as appears from a charter cited by Lord Strathallan in his history of the Drummonds, and others in the Register of the Great Seal.[2] He was killed on St Laurence Day (10 August) 1413, near Crieff, by Sir John Drummond of Concraig, Steward of Strathearn, in a skirmish between them arising out of the Earl-consort's dissatisfaction with Sir John's official duties.[3]

The Countess survived him, and received papal dispensations to marry Robert Stewart of Fife, eldest son of Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany (on 4 May 1414), and subsequently Robert's brother Walter (5 September 1415),.[4] She is alleged in Scots Peerage to have married Sir Patrick Dunbar of Bele, but this is erroneous: this was proved in 2009 to have been a second marriage of Euphemia Stewart, daughter of John Stewart of Railston and the mother of Countess Euphemia's husband Sir Patrick Graham<.[5] She was still alive in 1434,[6] but this is the last time she is mentioned in documents.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Lyons of Cossins and Wester Ogil: Cadets of Glamis by Andrew Ross, Marchmont Herald: Edinburgh: George Waterston & Sons 1901: p.9
  2. ^ James Balfour Paul, Scots Peerage, vol. viii, p. 260, citing Genealogie of the House of Drummond, 91 ; Reg. Mag. Sig., fol. 225, 236, 237, 246.
  3. ^ James Balfour Paul, Scots Peerage, vol. viii, p. 260, citing Fordun and Goodall, ii. 447.
  4. ^ James Balfour Paul, Scots Peerage, vol. viii, p. 260, citing Regesta Avenionensia, vols. 344, f. 70; 335, f. 649.
  5. ^ John P. Ravilious, The Ancestry of Sir William Graham of Montrose (d. 1424): Heraldry as Genealogical Evidence, The Scottish Genealogist (March 2009), Vol. LVI, No. 1, pp. 36-39.
  6. ^ James Balfour Paul, Scots Peerage, vol. viii, p. 260, citing Exch. Rolls, iv. pp. clix, 592.

References[edit]

  • Paul, James Balfour, The Scots Peerage, Vols. II & VIII, (Edinburgh, 1909)
  • Boardman, S. I., "Stewart, David, first earl of Strathearn and first earl of Caithness (b. in or after 1357?, d. 1386?)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 21 May 2007
  • John P. Ravilious, The Ancestry of Sir William Graham of Montrose (d. 1424): Heraldry as Genealogical Evidence, The Scottish Genealogist (March 2009), Vol. LVI, No. 1, pp. 36–39
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
David Stewart
Countess of Strathearn
c. 1386 – 1413
Succeeded by
Malise Graham
Countess of Caithness
c. 1386 – x 1402
Succeeded by
Walter Stewart