Eureka, Colorado

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Eureka
Mining ghost town
Remains of the old ore mill at Eureka
Remains of the old ore mill at Eureka
Eureka is located in Colorado
Eureka
Eureka
Location within the state of Colorado
Coordinates: 37°52′47″N 107°33′54″W / 37.87972°N 107.56500°W / 37.87972; -107.56500Coordinates: 37°52′47″N 107°33′54″W / 37.87972°N 107.56500°W / 37.87972; -107.56500
Country United States
State Colorado
County San Juan
Elevation 9,862 ft (3,006 m)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
GNIS feature ID 187402[1]

Eureka is a mining ghost town in San Juan County, Colorado, United States, along the Animas River, between Silverton and Animas Forks.[2][3]

History[edit]

Charles Baker's group of prospectors found traces of placer gold in the San Juan Mountains in 1860 at Eureka. Forced by the Ute Tribe out in 1861, who had been awarded the area in a US treaty. The prospectors returned in 1871, when lode gold was found in the Little Giant vein at Arrastre Gulch near Silverton, Colorado. The miners were allowed to stay after the Brunot Treaty of 13 Sept. 1873. In exchange for giving up 4 million acres, the Southern Ute Indian Reservation received $25,000 per year.[4]:49

By 1875, Eureka had a post office. The original mill was closed (reasons unknown) but to replace it, the Gold Prince Mill from Animas Forks was deconstructed and moved to the Eureka townsite to become the Sunnyside mill. In 1896, Eureka was connected to the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad via the Silverton Northern Railroad. Although the community grew steadily — not like a boomtown — it quickly declined after 1939, when the Sunnyside Mill closed for the last time. Today, the original townsite gravel roads remain, and debris litters the area. The only remaining structure is the Eureka jail, which has been restored. Foundations remain of the Sunnyside mill.

Geography[edit]

Its elevation is 9,862 feet (3,006 m).[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Eureka, Colorado". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2008-01-09. 
  2. ^ Eureka History
  3. ^ The Silverton Railroads
  4. ^ Voynick, S.M., 1992, Colorado Gold, Missoula: Mountain Press Publishing Company, ISBN 0878424555

External links[edit]