European Cultural Route

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A European Cultural Route is a title awarded to cultural routes recognised as significant throughout Europe by the Council of Europe. The European Institute of Cultural Routes is the body established to help the Council of Europe co-ordinate the development of these routes. Some are developed as scenic roads for motorists.

The first route awarded European Cultural Route status was the Way of St. James route (The French Way) to Santiago de Compostela in Spain in 1987.

History and goal[edit]

The "cultural routes of the Council of Europe" are tools of the European cultural cooperation implemented by the Council of Europe with the "European cultural convention" in 1954. The programme of the “cultural routes of the Council of Europe" was officially created in 1987 and is managed by an executive agency of the Council of Europe in Luxembourg since 1998: The European Institute of Cultural Routes. The programme is ruled by a resolution adopted by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe. The "cultural routes of the Council of Europe" aims at the protection, the valorisation and the transmission of the European cultural heritage as well as the cultural diversity of Europe. They also aim at the development of the intercultural dialogue.

List of European Cultural Routes[edit]

There are two titles awarded: Major Cultural Route of the Council of Europe and Cultural Route of the Council of Europe.

Major Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe[edit]

Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]