European Cup and UEFA Champions League records and statistics

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Map of UEFA countries, teams from which have reached the group stage of the UEFA Champions League
  UEFA member country that has been represented in the group stage
  UEFA member country that has not been represented in the group stage
  Not a UEFA member

This page details statistics of the European Cup and Champions League. Unless notified these statistics concern all seasons since inception of the European Cup in the 1955–56 season, including qualifying rounds of the UEFA Champions League as per "Competition facts";[1] all goals scored before league phase(s) count as "qualifying goals".

Contents

General performances[edit]

By club[edit]

A total of 22 clubs have won the tournament since it's 1955 inception, with Real Madrid being the only team to win it 10 times, including the first five. Only two other clubs have reached 10 finals; AC Milan and Bayern Munich. A total of 12 clubs have won the tournament multiple times; the three aforementioned clubs, along with Liverpool, Ajax, Barcelona, Internazionale, Manchester United, Benfica, Nottingham Forest, Juventus, and Porto. A total of 17 clubs have reached the final without ever managing to win the tournament.

Clubs from 10 different countries have provided tournament winners. Spanish clubs have been the most successful, winning a total of 14. Italy and England are joint-second with 12, while the other multiple-time winners are Germany with 7, Netherlands with 6, and Portugal with 4. The only other countries to provide a tournament winner are Scotland, Romania, Yugoslavia, and France. Greece, Belgium and Sweden have all provided losing finalists.

Clubs from a total of 35 European cities have participated in the tournament final, while clubs from 21 cities have provided winners, with Madrid and Milan each winning 10; though both AC Milan and Internazionale have helped Milan be successful, only Real Madrid have won it for Madrid, with Atletico managing to lose two finals.

Performance in the European Cup/UEFA Champions League by club
Club
Winners Runners-up Years won Years runner-up
Spain Real Madrid 10 3 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1966, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2014 1962, 1964, 1981
Italy Milan 7 4 1963, 1969, 1989, 1990, 1994, 2003, 2007 1958, 1993, 1995, 2005
Germany Bayern Munich 5 5 1974, 1975, 1976, 2001, 2013 1982, 1987, 1999, 2010, 2012
England Liverpool 5 2 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 2005 1985, 2007
Spain Barcelona 4 3 1992, 2006, 2009, 2011 1961, 1986, 1994
Netherlands Ajax 4 2 1971, 1972, 1973, 1995 1969, 1996
Italy Internazionale 3 2 1964, 1965, 2010 1967, 1972
England Manchester United 3 2 1968, 1999, 2008 2009, 2011
Portugal Benfica 2 5 1961, 1962 1963, 1965, 1968, 1988, 1990
Italy Juventus 2 5 1985, 1996 1973, 1983, 1997, 1998, 2003
England Nottingham Forest 2 0 1979, 1980 &
Portugal Porto 2 0 1987, 2004 &
Scotland Celtic 1 1 1967 1970
Germany Hamburg 1 1 1983 1980
Romania Steaua București 1 1 1986 1989
France Marseille 1 1 1993 1991
Germany Borussia Dortmund 1 1 1997 2013
England Chelsea 1 1 2012 2008
Netherlands Feyenoord 1 0 1970 &
England Aston Villa 1 0 1982 &
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 1 0 1988 &
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 1 0 1991 &
France Stade de Reims 0 2 &
1956, 1959
Spain Atlético Madrid 0 2 &
1974, 2014
Spain Valencia 0 2 &
2000, 2001
Italy Fiorentina 0 1 &
1957
Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 0 1 &
1960
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 0 1 &
1966
Greece Panathinaikos 0 1 &
1971
England Leeds United 0 1 &
1975
France Saint-Étienne 0 1 &
1976
Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 0 1 &
1977
Belgium Club Brugge 0 1 &
1978
Sweden Malmö FF 0 1 &
1979
Italy Roma 0 1 &
1984
Italy Sampdoria 0 1 &
1992
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 0 1 &
2002
France AS Monaco 0 1 &
2004
England Arsenal 0 1 &
2006

By nation[edit]

Country Winners Runners-up Winning clubs Runners-up
 Spain 14 10 Real Madrid (10)
Barcelona (4)
Barcelona (3), Real Madrid (3)
Valencia (2), Atlético Madrid (2)
 Italy 12 14 Milan (7)
Internazionale (3)
Juventus (2)
Juventus (5)
Milan (4)
Internazionale (2)
Fiorentina (1), Roma (1), Sampdoria (1)
 England 12 7 Liverpool (5)
Manchester United (3)
Nottingham Forest (2)
Aston Villa (1), Chelsea (1)
Liverpool (2), Manchester United (2)
Leeds United (1), Arsenal (1), Chelsea (1)
 Germany 7 10 Bayern Munich (5)
Hamburg (1), Borussia Dortmund (1)
Bayern Munich (5)
Eintracht Frankfurt (1), Borussia Mönchengladbach (1), Hamburg (1), Bayer Leverkusen (1), Borussia Dortmund (1)
 Netherlands 6 2 Ajax (4)
Feyenoord (1), PSV Eindhoven (1)
Ajax (2)
 Portugal 4 5 Benfica (2), Porto (2) Benfica (5)
 France 1 5 Marseille (1) Stade de Reims (2)
Saint-Étienne (1), Marseille (1), AS Monaco (1)
 Yugoslavia 1 1 Red Star Belgrade (1) Partizan (1)
 Romania 1 1 Steaua București (1) Steaua București (1)
 Scotland 1 1 Celtic (1) Celtic (1)
 Greece 0 1 &
Panathinaikos (1)
 Belgium 0 1 &
Club Brugge (1)
 Sweden 0 1 &
Malmö FF (1)

By city[edit]

[2][3]

City Winners Runners-up Winning clubs Runners-up
Italy Milan 10 6 Milan (7)
Internazionale (3)
Milan (4)
Internazionale (2)
Spain Madrid 10 5 Real Madrid (10) Real Madrid (3)
Atlético Madrid (2)
Germany Munich 5 5 Bayern Munich (5) Bayern Munich (5)
England Liverpool 5 2 Liverpool (5) Liverpool (2)
Spain Barcelona 4 3 Barcelona (4) Barcelona (3)
Netherlands Amsterdam 4 2 Ajax (4) Ajax (2)
England Manchester 3 2 Manchester United (3) Manchester United (2)
Portugal Lisbon 2 5 Benfica (2) Benfica (5)
Italy Turin 2 5 Juventus (2) Juventus (5)
England Nottingham 2 0 Nottingham Forest (2)
Portugal Porto 2 0 Porto (2)
England London 1 2 Chelsea (1) Arsenal (1), Chelsea (1)
Scotland Glasgow 1 1 Celtic (1) Celtic (1)
Germany Hamburg 1 1 Hamburg (1) Hamburg (1)
Romania Bucharest 1 1 Steaua Bucureşti (1) Steaua Bucureşti (1)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade 1 1 Red Star Belgrade (1) Partizan (1)
France Marseille 1 1 Marseille (1) Marseille (1)
Germany Dortmund 1 1 Borussia Dortmund (1) Borussia Dortmund (1)
Netherlands Rotterdam 1 0 Feyenoord (1)
England Birmingham 1 0 Aston Villa (1)
Netherlands Eindhoven 1 0 PSV Eindhoven (1)
France Reims 0 2 Stade de Reims (2)
Spain Valencia 0 2 Valencia (2)
Italy Florence 0 1 Fiorentina (1)
Germany Frankfurt 0 1 Eintracht Frankfurt (1)
Greece Athens 0 1 Panathinaikos (1)
England Leeds 0 1 Leeds United (1)
France Saint-Étienne 0 1 Saint-Étienne (1)
Germany Mönchengladbach 0 1 Borussia Mönchengladbach (1)
Belgium Bruges 0 1 Club Brugge (1)
Sweden Malmö 0 1 Malmö FF (1)
Italy Rome 0 1 Roma (1)
Italy Genoa 0 1 Sampdoria (1)
Germany Leverkusen 0 1 Bayer Leverkusen (1)
Monaco Monaco 0 1 Monaco (1)

All-time top ten European Cup and Champions League table[edit]

This list is current as of 16 December 2013.

Rank Club Years Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Pts% FW F SF QF
1 Spain Real Madrid 44 372 219 64 89 823 408 +414 516 58,87 10 13 25 31
2 Germany Bayern Munich 30 287 161 64 62 549 284 +265 393 56.09 5 10 16 25
3 Spain Barcelona 24 255 145 61 49 498 251 +247 357 56,86 4 7 15 18
4 England Manchester United 26 253 141 62 50 469 240 +229 352 55,90 3 5 12 18
5 Italy Milan 28 249 125 64 60 414 231 +183 317 50.20 7 11 13 17
6 Italy Juventus 28 217 106 55 56 350 217 +133 268 48.84 2 7 10 15
7 Portugal Benfica 33 212 99 49 64 363 229 +134 251 46.69 2 7 8 17
8 England Liverpool 20 175 99 39 37 317 144 +173 237 56.57 5 7 9 13
9 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 32 212 92 44 76 307 259 +48 228 43.39 0 0 3 9
10 Portugal Porto 28 197 85 47 65 276 216 +60 218 43.14 2 2 3 8


Clubs[edit]

Performance review (from 1992–93)[edit]

By semi-final appearances (European Cup and UEFA Champions League)[edit]

Team No. Years
Spain Real Madrid 25 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1973, 1976, 1980, 1981, 1987, 1988, 1989
1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
Germany Bayern Munich 16 1974, 1975, 1976, 1981, 1982, 1987, 1990, 1991
1995, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014
Spain Barcelona 15 1960, 1961, 1975, 1986
1992, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
Italy Milan 13 1956, 1958, 1963, 1969, 1989, 1990
1993, 1994, 1995, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007
England Manchester United 12 1957, 1958, 1966, 1968, 1969
1997, 1999, 2002, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
Italy Juventus 10 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1985
1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003
England Liverpool 9 1965, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 1985
2005, 2007, 2008
Portugal Benfica 8 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1988, 1990
Italy Internazionale 8 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1972, 1981
2003, 2010
Netherlands Ajax 8 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1980
1995, 1996, 1997
England Chelsea 7 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2014
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 4 1957, 1971, 1991, 1992
Spain Atlético Madrid 4 1959, 1971, 1974
2014
Germany Borussia Dortmund 4 1964
1997, 1998, 2013
Scotland Celtic 4 1967, 1970, 1972, 1974
West Germany Hamburg 3 1961, 1980, 1983
England Leeds United 3 1970, 1975
2001
Greece Panathinaikos 3 1971, 1985
1996
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven 3 1976, 1988
2005
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 3 1977, 1987
1999
Romania Steaua București 3 1986, 1988, 1989
Portugal Porto 3 1987
1994, 2004
France Marseille 3 1990, 1991
1993
France AS Monaco 3 1994, 1998, 2004
France Stade de Reims 2 1956, 1959
Scotland Rangers 2 1960
1993
Netherlands Feyenoord 2 1963, 1970
Switzerland Zürich 2 1964, 1977
Bulgaria CSKA Sofia 2 1967, 1982
France Saint-Étienne 2 1975, 1976
West Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 2 1977, 1978
England Nottingham Forest 2 1979, 1980
Belgium Anderlecht 2 1982, 1986
Sweden IFK Göteborg 2 1986
1993
Spain Valencia 2 2000, 2001
England Arsenal 2 2006, 2009
Scotland Hibernian 1 1956
Italy Fiorentina 1 1957
Hungary Vasas 1 1958
Switzerland Young Boys 1 1959
West Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 1 1960
Austria Rapid Wien 1 1961
Belgium Standard Liège 1 1962
England Tottenham Hotspur 1 1962
Scotland Dundee 1 1963
Hungary Győri ETO 1 1965
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 1 1966
Czechoslovakia Dukla Praha 1 1967
Czechoslovakia Spartak Trnava 1 1969
Poland Legia Warsaw 1 1970
England Derby County 1 1973
Hungary Újpest 1 1974
Belgium Club Brugge 1 1978
Austria Austria Wien 1 1979
West Germany Köln 1 1979
Sweden Malmö FF 1 1979
England Aston Villa 1 1982
Spain Real Sociedad 1 1983
Poland Widzew Łódź 1 1983
Romania Dinamo Bucureşti 1 1984
Scotland Dundee United 1 1984
Italy Roma 1 1984
France Bordeaux 1 1985
Turkey Galatasaray 1 1989
Soviet Union Spartak Moscow 1 1991
Czechoslovakia Sparta Praha 1 1992
Italy Sampdoria 1 1992
France Paris Saint-Germain 1 1995
France Nantes 1 1996
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 1 2002
Spain Deportivo La Coruña 1 2004
Spain Villarreal 1 2006
France Lyon 1 2010
Germany Schalke 04 1 2011
Team in Bold: Finalist team in season

Note: In the 1992 and 1993 seasons there were no semi-finals as the finalists qualified via a group stage. The winners (Sampdoria and Barcelona in 1992, Marseille and Milan in 1993) and runner-ups (Red Star Belgrade and Sparta Prague in 1992, Rangers and IFK Göteborg in 1993) of the two groups are marked as semi-finalists in the table.

Presidents records[edit]

Jaap van Praag and Michael van Praag are the first father and son to have won the competition during the presidency of the same team, AFC Ajax. This team won the Champions League in different periods with these presidents, in 1970–71, 1971–72, 1972–73 and 1994-95.

Angelo Moratti and Massimo Moratti are the second father and son to have won the competition during the presidency of the same team, Internazionale. This team won the Champions League in different periods with these presidents, in 1963–64, 1964–65 and 2009–10.

Unbeaten sides[edit]

  • The team to have won the European Cup with the fewest games won is PSV (1987–88), managing just three victories in the entire tournament (including none from the quarter-finals onwards).
  • The team to have won the Champions League with the fewest games won is Manchester United (1998–99), five wins
  • Two teams have won the Champions League with the most games lost, Milan (2002–03) and Real Madrid (1999–00), both losing four games

Final success rate[edit]

Statue of Brian Clough, Nottingham Forest manager in 1979 and 1980

Consecutive participations[edit]

Consecutive finals[edit]

Consecutive semifinals[edit]

The record for consecutive semifinals is six, held by Barcelona (2007–08 to 2012–13). The record stopped by losing to Atletico Madrid in quarterfinals of 2013–14.

Winning other trophies[edit]

See also Treble (association football) and Tuples in association football.

Although not an officially recognized achievement, seven clubs have achieved the distinction of winning the Champions League or European Cup, their domestic championship, and their primary domestic cup competition in the same season, known colloquially as "the treble":

Liverpool in 1984 won the English First Division and the European Cup. However, this 'treble' included the Football League Cup rather than the FA Cup.

Bayern Munich in 2001 won the Fußball-Bundesliga and the Champions League. However, this 'treble' included the DFB-Ligapokal rather than the DFB-Pokal.

In addition to this treble, several of these clubs went on to win further cups. However, most of these cups were technically won the following year following the conclusion of regular domestic or international leagues the year before. Also, several domestic cups may not have been extant at the time that equivalent cups were won by clubs of other nations, and in some cases they remain so. Furthermore, there is much variance in the regard with which several cups are taken both over time and between nations. Regardless, the following clubs all won competitions further to the treble mentioned above:

Juventus, Ajax, Bayern Munich and Chelsea are also the only teams to have won the three major UEFA official Cups, namely UEFA Champions League/European Cup, UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, and UEFA Cup/Europa League.[4]

Juventus was the first club in association football history—and remain the only one at present—to have won all official continental tournaments and the world champions title.[4][5][6]

Chelsea became the first club to hold the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League trophies simultaneously by winning 2011–12 UEFA Champions League and 2012–13 UEFA Europa League.[7]

Biggest wins[edit]

Biggest two leg wins[edit]

Deciding drawn ties[edit]

Most goals in a match[edit]

Not winning the domestic league[edit]

  • Nottingham Forest is the only club to have won the European Cup more times (twice) than they have won their domestic league (once). Forest won the English League in 1978 before winning the European Cup in 1979 and defending it in 1980. Nottingham Forest are also the only previous winners of the European Cup to be later relegated to the third tier of their national league (in 2005).
  • The competition format was changed in 1997–98 to allow teams that were not champions of their domestic league to compete in the competition. Since then there have been European Champions who had not been domestic champions. Notable instances include the following
    • Manchester United's treble-winners of 1999 were the first winners of the tournament to have won neither their domestic title nor the European Cup/Champions League the previous season. Since then, Real Madrid (2000, 2014), Milan (2003 and 2007), Liverpool (2005), Barcelona (2009) and Chelsea (2012) have achieved this feat.
    • Liverpool's 2005 triumph came 15 years after their previous domestic league title (1990). That was the longest time any Champions League winner had gone since previously winning their league. Prior to this, the longest time period for any winner was Milan, whose victory in 2003 had come four years since their last Serie A win.
  • Bayer Leverkusen (in 2002) is the only club to play in the final having never won their domestic league.

Comebacks[edit]

Filippo Inzaghi and Juventus drew their first five games in 1998–99

Defence[edit]

  • Arsenal hold the record for the most consecutive clean sheets with ten in 2005–06. They went without conceding a goal for 995 minutes between September 2005 and May 2006.[10] The run started after Markus Rosenberg's goal for Ajax after 71 minutes on matchday two of the group stage, continued with four group stage games and six games in the knockout rounds, and ended with Samuel Eto'o's goal for Barcelona after 76 minutes in the final. The 995 minutes were split between two goalkeepers, Jens Lehmann with 648 and Manuel Almunia with 347 minutes.
  • Manchester United hold the record for the longest run without conceding from the start of a campaign, with 481 minutes in 2010–11. The run ended with Pablo Hernández's goal for Valencia after 32 minutes on matchday six of the group stage.
  • Manchester United in 2010–11 is the only team to play six away games in a single Champions League season without conceding a goal

Defending the trophy[edit]

A total of 58 tournaments have been played, 37 in the European Cup era (1955–56 to 1991–92) and 21 in the Champions League era (1992–93 to 2012–13). 13 of the 57 attempts to defend the trophy (22.8%) have been successful, split between 8 teams. These are:

Between the two eras of this competition, this breaks down as:

  • Of the 37 attempts in the European Cup era: 13 successful (35.1%)
  • Of the 20 attempts in the Champions League era: 0 successful

The teams closest to defending the trophy in the Champions League era, all making it to the final:

Of the 22 teams that have won the trophy, 14 have never defended it. Only four of these have won the trophy more than once, and so have had more than one attempt to do so. These are:

During the Champions League era, only one title holder has failed to qualify from the group stage:

Nationalities[edit]

Countries[edit]

Cities[edit]

Specific group stage records[edit]

6 wins[edit]

José Mourinho and Real Madrid won all six group stage matches in 2011–12
Frank Rijkaard and Milan won all six group stage matches in 1992–93

Five clubs have won all their games in a group stage:

6 draws[edit]

Only one club has drawn all their games in a group stage:

6 losses[edit]

In the history of the Champions League, the following clubs have lost all 6 group stage matches:

  • Košice (1997–98) ended the group stage losing all 6 matches with a goal difference of –11. They conceded 13 goals, scoring only twice.
  • Fenerbahçe (2001–02) lost all 6 group stage matches with a goal difference of –9. They conceded 12 goals and scored only 3.
  • Spartak Moscow (2002–03) have the second worst goal difference in a Champions League group stage with –17. They lost all 6 matches, conceding 18 goals and scoring just once.
  • Bayer Leverkusen (2002–03, second group stage) lost all 6 matches, scoring 5 and conceding 15. This was the only time that a club lost all matches in the second group stage. It was also the first time that two clubs lost six group stage matches in the same season.
  • Anderlecht (2004–05) lost all 6 of their group stage matches. They conceded 17 goals and scored just 4, with a goal difference of –13.
  • Rapid Vienna (2005–06) ended the group stage losing all 6 games. They conceded 15 goals and scored only 3, with a goal difference of –12.
  • Levski Sofia (2006–07) finished their only appearance in the group stage conceding 17 goals and scoring just one, ending with a goal difference of –16.
  • Dynamo Kyiv (2007–08) ended the group stage also losing all 6 games. They conceded 19 goals, scoring only 4, ending with a goal difference of –15.
  • Maccabi Haifa (2009–10) is the only club to have lost all their group stage matches without scoring a goal. They did this finishing only their second appearance in the competition with 0 points after losing to Bayern Munich 3–0 in the first group game and then losing 5 consecutive games 1–0, ending the group stage with a goal difference of –8. In their first Champions League appearance in 2002–03, the team scored 12 goals. Deportivo La Coruña is the only other club that scored no goals in the group stage (in 2004–05), but they collected 2 points by twice drawing 0–0.
  • Debrecen (2009–10) finished the group stage with 0 points and a goal difference of –14. They conceded 19 goals, scoring just 5.
  • Partizan Belgrade (2010–11) lost all six group stage matches. They conceded 13 goals while scoring only 2, finishing with a goal difference of –11.
  • MŠK Žilina (2010–11) also finished the group stage with 0 points and a goal difference of –16, scoring 3 and conceding 19. This was the second consecutive season that two different clubs had lost all six group stage matches.
  • Dinamo Zagreb (2011–12) lost all six group stage matches, setting new records for worst goal difference (–19) and most goals conceded (22), scoring 3.
  • Villarreal (2011–12) also finished with 0 points and goal difference of –12, scoring 2 and conceding 14.
  • Oțelul Galați (2011–12) as well finished with 0 points and goal difference of –8, scoring 3 and conceding 11. That became the first season in which three separate teams had lost all six group stage matches, and a third consecutive season in which at least two teams finished with 0 points.
  • Marseille (2013–14) finished with 0 points, scoring 5 and conceding 14 goals for a goal difference of –9.

Two goals in each match[edit]

Four teams have managed to score at least two goals in each match of the group stage:

Advancing past the group stage[edit]

Real Madrid hold the record of the most consecutive seasons in advancing past the group stage with 17 from 1997–98 to 2013–14. The first seven seasons (1997–98 to 2003–04) they qualified for at least the quarterfinal each year, winning the tournament three times. After this followed six consecutive seasons (2004–05 to 2009–10) losing the first round (round of 16) after the group stage.

In 2012–13, Chelsea became the first title holder not to qualify from the following year's group stage.

Biggest disparity between group winner and runner-up[edit]

Luis Enrique and Barcelona won group H by 11 points in 2002–03

The biggest points difference between the first- and second-placed teams in a Champions League group phase is 11 points, achieved by two teams:

Most points achieved, yet knocked out[edit]

Most points achieved in the group stage, not winning the group[edit]

Fewest points achieved, yet advanced[edit]

Knocked out on tiebreakers[edit]

Several teams have been knocked out on a tiebreaker, most on the head-to-head criteria:

Knocked out on 3 points for a win rule[edit]

1995–96 was the first tournament in which three points were awarded for a win instead of two. The following teams were knocked out from the group stage, but would have advanced following the old rule:

Qualifying from First qualifying round[edit]

Since the addition of a third qualifying round in 1999–2000, four teams have negotiated all three rounds of qualification and reached the Champions League group phase:

Liverpool went on to become the first team in the history of the competition to reach the knockout phase from the first qualifying round.

No team has progressed to the group stage from the First Qualifying Round since the Champion's League Format was altered from the 2009-10 season onwards.

Winning after playing in a qualifying round[edit]

Josep Guardiola coached Barcelona to victory through qualification in 2009.

Four teams have managed to win the tournament from the third qualification round:

Consecutive goalscoring[edit]

Real Madrid hold the record of consecutive goalscoring in the Champions League matches. They have scored at least one goal in 34 consecutive games. The run started with a 1–1 draw against Barcelona in the second leg of the semi-final of the 2010–11 season. This continued with all 12 matches of both the 2011–12 season and 2012–13 season, and continued into the 2013–14 season for nine games (six group stage games, both legs of the round of 16 and the first leg of the quarter-finals), with the run finally coming to an end in a 2–0 away loss in the quarter-finals second leg against Borussia Dortmund on 8 April 2014.

Consecutive home wins[edit]

Manchester United hold the record of consecutive home wins in the Champions League. They have 12 consecutive home wins which was achieved when they defeated Barcelona 1–0 on 29 April 2008. This run was ended with a 0–0 draw against Villarreal on 17 September 2008.

Consecutive away wins[edit]

Bayern Munich equaled the record of Ajax (1995–1997) for consecutive away wins in the Champions League having won 7 consecutive away games. The run began with a 3–1 win against Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium in the first leg of the 2012–13 round of 16, and continued through to the final, with wins against Juventus (2–0) at the Juventus Stadium and against Barcelona (3–0) at the Camp Nou. In the 2013–14 season the streak continued with group stage wins over Manchester City (3–0) at the City of Manchester Stadium, CSKA Moscow (3–1) and Viktoria Plzeň (1–0). The record equaling seventh win was achieved when they again defeated Arsenal 2–0 at the Emirates Stadium in the round of 16 first leg on 19 February 2014. Their run ended with a 1-1 draw at Old Trafford against Manchester United in the first leg of the quarter-finals.[12]

Consecutive wins[edit]

Bayern Munich (2012–13, 2013–14) hold the record of 10 consecutive wins in the Champions League. Bayern Munich's run started on 2 April 2013 in the 2–0 win against Juventus in the first leg of the quarter final of the 2012–13 season after losing 2–0 against Arsenal three weeks earlier. The run continued in the other three knockout matches and the final of the 2012–13 season. The run continued in the first five group stage matches of the 2013–14 season, but ended with the sixth in a 2-3 home defeat against Manchester City on 10 December 2013.

Longest home undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest unbeaten run at home stands at 31 games and is held by Bayern Munich. The run began with a 0–0 draw against Borussia Dortmund in 1997–98 and finished with a 2–1 win against Real Madrid in the first leg of the quarter finals 2001–02. The 31 game unbeaten run ended with a 2–3 loss to Deportivo La Coruña in the first group stage in 2002–03.

Longest away undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest away unbeaten run stands at 16 games and is held by Manchester United. The run began with a 1–0 win against Sporting Clube de Portugal in the 2007–08 group stage. It lasted until the 3–2 win against Milan at the Giuseppe Meazza in the first leg of the first knockout stage 2009–10. The run ended with a 1–2 defeat to Bayern in the first leg of the quarter final 2009–10. During this run Manchester United were beaten 2–0 by Barcelona in the 2009 final. This game, however, was at a neutral venue and as such is not classified as an away game.

Longest undefeated run[edit]

The record for the longest unbeaten run stands at 25 games and is held by Manchester United. It began with a 1–0 away win against Sporting Clube de Portugal in their opening group stage game in 2007–08 and finished with a 3–1 away win against Arsenal in the second leg of the semi-final in 2008–09. The 25 game unbeaten streak ended with a 0–2 loss to Barcelona in the 2009 final.

This broke the previous record of 20 consecutive games unbeaten by Ajax, which began with a 0–0 home draw against F.C. Porto in the second leg of the first round in 1985–86, and after an eight-year hiatus from the competition resumed through a 2–0 home win against Milan in their opening group stage game in 1994–95 and ended with a 0–1 home loss to Panathinaikos in the first leg of the semi-final in 1995–96.

The third longest run is 19 by Bayern Munich, which began with a 1–0 home win against Arsenal on matchday six of the second group stage in 2000–01, and ended with a 0–2 away loss to Real Madrid in the second leg of the quarter-finals in 2001–02.

Players[edit]

Appearances[edit]

Raúl is the all-time top goalscorer in all European club competitions

28 players have made 100 or more Champions League appearances (including qualifying games): Zlatan Ibrahimović, Raúl, Roberto Carlos, Andriy Shevchenko, Paolo Maldini, David Beckham, Oliver Kahn, Luís Figo, Clarence Seedorf, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, Thierry Henry, Gary Neville, Fernando Morientes, Iker Casillas, Xavi, Roar Strand, Carles Puyol, Edwin van der Sar, Oleksandr Shovkovskiy, Zinedine Zidane, Javier Zanetti, Cristiano Ronaldo, Ashley Cole, Petr Čech, Víctor Valdés, Frank Lampard and John Terry. Of these 28 players, 13 have made their appearances all for a single club:

All-time appearances (European Cup and UEFA Champions League)[edit]

Including qualifying rounds

Rank Player Nation Appearances Goals Goal ratio Clubs
1 Ryan Giggs Wales 151 30 0.20 Manchester United
2 Xavi Spain 149 12 0.08 Barcelona
3 Raúl Spain 144 71 0.49 Real Madrid, Schalke 04
Iker Casillas Spain 144 0 0.00 Real Madrid
5 Paolo Maldini Italy 141 3 0.02 Milan
6 Clarence Seedorf Netherlands 131 12 0.09 Ajax, Real Madrid, Internazionale, Milan
7 Paul Scholes England 130 25 0.19 Manchester United
8 Roberto Carlos Brazil 128 17 0.13 Real Madrid, Fenerbahçe
9 Carles Puyol Spain 120 2 0.02 Barcelona
10 Andriy Shevchenko Ukraine 116 59 0.51 Dynamo Kyiv, Milan, Chelsea

Players in Bold are still active in Europe.

UEFA Champions League (1992–93 onwards)[edit]

Excluding qualifying rounds[13][14]

Rank Player Nation Appearances Clubs
1 Xavi Spain 143 Barcelona
2 Raúl Spain 142 Real Madrid, Schalke 04
Iker Casillas Spain 142 Real Madrid
4 Ryan Giggs Wales 141 Manchester United
5 Clarence Seedorf Netherlands 125 Ajax, Real Madrid, Internazionale, Milan
6 Paul Scholes England 124 Manchester United
7 Roberto Carlos Brazil 120 Real Madrid, Fenerbahçe
8 Paolo Maldini Italy 116 Milan
9 Carlos Puyol Spain 115 Barcelona
10 Thierry Henry France 112 AS Monaco, Arsenal, Barcelona

Players in Bold are still active in Europe.

Goalscoring[edit]

All-time top scorers (European Cup and UEFA Champions League)[edit]

Including qualifying rounds

Rank Player Nation Goals Goals in knockout phase Goals in round-robin phase Goals in qualifying rounds Games Years Clubs
1 Cristiano Ronaldo Portugal 71 34 36 1 110 '02– Manchester United (16), Real Madrid (55)
2 Raúl Spain 71 20 51 0 144 '95–'11 Real Madrid (66), Schalke 04 (5)
3 Lionel Messi Argentina 69 31 37 0 89 '04– Barcelona (68)
4 Ruud van Nistelrooy Netherlands 60 6 50 4 81 '98–'09 PSV (9), Man. United (38), Real Madrid (13)
5 Andriy Shevchenko Ukraine 59 18 30 11 116 '94–'11 Dynamo Kyiv (23), Milan (32), Chelsea (4)
6 Thierry Henry France 51 12 38 1 115 '97–'10 Monaco (7), Arsenal (35), Barcelona (9)
7 Filippo Inzaghi Italy 50 16 30 4 85 '97–'10 Juventus (17), Milan (33)
8 Alfredo Di Stéfano Argentina 49 58 '55–'64 Real Madrid (49)
9 Eusébio Portugal 47 64 '61–'74 Benfica (47)
10 Alessandro Del Piero Italy 43 9 32 2 92 '95–'09 Juventus (43)

UEFA Champions League (from 1992–93 onwards)[edit]

Excludes qualifying rounds

Rank Player Nation Goals Games Goal ratio Clubs
1 Raúl Spain 71 142 0.50 Real Madrid, Schalke 04
2 Cristiano Ronaldo Portugal 70 106 0.66 Manchester United, Real Madrid
3 Lionel Messi Argentina 69 88 0.77 Barcelona
4 Ruud van Nistelrooy Netherlands 56 73 0.77 PSV Eindhoven, Manchester United, Real Madrid
5 Thierry Henry France 50 112 0.45 Monaco, Arsenal, Barcelona
6 Andriy Shevchenko Ukraine 48 100 0.48 Dynamo Kyiv, Milan, Chelsea
7 Filippo Inzaghi Italy 46 81 0.57 Parma, Juventus, Milan
8 Didier Drogba Ivory Coast 43 89 0.48 Marseille, Chelsea, Galatasaray
9 Alessandro Del Piero Italy 41 89 0.46 Juventus
10 Zlatan Ibrahimović Sweden 41 104 0.39 Ajax, Juventus, Internazionale, Barcelona, Milan, PSG

Players in Bold are still active in Europe.

Top scorer awards[edit]

Gerd Müller won the top scorer award four times

The top scorer award is for the player who amassed the most goals in the tournament, excluding the qualifying rounds.

Most goals in a single season[edit]

Goals Player(s)
17 Cristiano Ronaldo
14 Lionel Messi, José Altafini
12 Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi, Gerd Müller,
Ruud van Nistelrooy, Ferenc Puskás, Mario Gómez
11 Claudio Sulser, José Águas
10 Ruud van Nistelrooy, Rivaldo, Alessandro Del Piero, Kaká,
Raúl, Marco van Basten, Mário Jardel, Søren Lerby,
Antonis Antoniadis, Just Fontaine, Alfredo Di Stéfano

Hat-tricks[edit]

Four goals in a match[edit]

Ferenc Puskás scored four goals against Eintracht Frankfurt in the 1959–60 final.
Marco van Basten twice scored four goals in one match.
Ruud van Nistelrooy scored four goals against Sparta Prague in 2004–05.
Robert Lewandowski scored four goals for Borussia Dortmund in the semi-finals in 2013

The following players have scored four goals in one European Cup/UEFA Champions League match. Only Alfredo Di Stéfano, Ferenc Puskás, Sándor Kocsis, Lionel Messi and Robert Lewandowski managed to do this from the quarter-final stage onwards and Ferenc Puskás is the only footballer to score four goals in a final (1960).

Five goals in a match[edit]

Luiz Adriano scored five goals in Shakhtar Donetsk's 7-0 win against BATE including a record four goals in first half in 2014–15

The following players have managed to score five goals in one European Cup/UEFA Champions League match:

Oldest and youngest[edit]

Other goalscoring records[edit]

Roy Makaay scored the fastest ever Champions League goal.
Zlatan Ibrahimović has scored for six different clubs.
Raúl is the only player to score in 14 consecutive Champions League seasons.
Ryan Giggs has scored in 16 different Champions League seasons.
  • Three goalkeepers have scored in the Champions League:
    • Hans-Jörg Butt has done so three times with three different clubs, all with penalties, and all against Juventus:
      • For Hamburg in a 4–4 home draw on Wednesday 13 September 2000 in a group stage match
      • For Leverkusen in a 3–1 home win on Tuesday 12 March 2002 in a second group stage match
      • The equaliser for Bayern Munich on Tuesday 8 December 2009 in a group stage match in Turin which Bayern had to win to qualify for the next stage, and went on to win 4–1.
    • Sinan Bolat is the only goalkeeper to score a goal in open play: his last-minute (90+5) equalizer for Standard Liège against AZ on 9 December 2009, securing the third place in Group H, led his team to the Europa League.
    • Vincent Enyeama (Hapoel Tel Aviv) scored a penalty on 29 September 2010, playing against Lyon.
  • Zlatan Ibrahimović is the only player to have scored for six different teams in the UEFA Champions League:
    • Ajax (6 goals in 19 games; 2002–03 to 2003–04)
    • Juventus (3 goals in 19 games; 2004–05 to 2005–06)
    • Internazionale (6 goals in 22 games; 2006–07 to 2008–09)
    • Barcelona (4 goals in 10 games; 2009–10)
    • Milan (9 goals in 14 games; 2010–11 to 2011-12).
    • Paris Saint-Germain (10 goals in 13 games; 2012–13 to 2013–14).

Other records[edit]

Most wins[edit]

Paolo Maldini, winner of two European Cups and three Champions League titles with Milan appeared in eight finals
Clarence Seedorf was the first player to win the tournament with three different teams

Oldest and youngest[edit]

Goalkeeping[edit]

  • Jens Lehmann holds the record for the most consecutive clean sheets, with 10 for Arsenal in the 2005–06 and 2006–07 seasons. In total his run without conceding a goal lasted 853 minutes.[21]
  • Helmuth Duckadam holds the record of saving all 4 penalties during the shoot-out in the 1986 final between Steaua Bucharest vs Barcelona.

Disciplinary[edit]

Only two players have ever been sent off in a Champions League Final: Jens Lehmann (Arsenal) in the 2006 Final against Barcelona (sent off by Terje Hauge in the 18th minute after bringing down Samuel Eto'o); and Didier Drogba (Chelsea) in the 2008 Champions League Final (sent off by Ľuboš Micheľ in the 117th minute for slapping Manchester United player Nemanja Vidić). Both players' teams lost their respective finals.

Edgar Davids, Patrick Vieira, Didier Drogba and Zlatan Ibrahimović jointly hold the record for the most red cards in the Champions League. They have each been sent off three times.

Patrick Vieira is also the only player to have been sent off for three different teams in the Champions League (Arsenal, Juventus, and Internazionale).

Paul Scholes holds the record for the most yellow cards in the Champions League. He has received a total of 32 yellow cards.[22]

Trivia[edit]

  • Michael Ballack became the first player to reach the Champions League quarter-finals with four separate clubs in 2007.[23]

Managers[edit]

Records[edit]

Carlo Ancelotti is the only manager to hold the record of three times champions and a runners-up of the UEFA Champions League.

Winning other trophies[edit]

Vicente del Bosque is the only manager to win the UEFA Champions League, the World Cup and the European Championship

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "UEFA Champions League - Season 2009/10 - Matchweek stats pack" (PDF). UEFA.com. Retrieved 12 October 2014. 
  2. ^ Horncastle, James (5 October 2012). "AC Milan v Inter Milan: Financial troubles hit both clubs". BBC. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  3. ^ Umair, M.A. (7 May 2013). "Champions League Winners: The most successful countries and cities". SoccerLens. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "List of European official clubs' cups and tournaments". uefa.com. Retrieved 21 August 2006. 
  5. ^ "FIFA Club World Championship TOYOTA Cup: Solidarity – the name of the game" (PDF). FIFA Activity Report 2005 (Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association): 62. April 2004 – May 2005. Retrieved 17 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "We are the champions". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 2005-12-01. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  7. ^ "Ivanović heads Chelsea to Europa League glory". Retrieved 29 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Manager Profile: Sir Bobby Robson". [dead link]
  9. ^ "Italian media hit out at 'crazy' Inter". ESPN Soccernet. Retrieved 28 September 2006. 
  10. ^ Football | Champions League | Trivia: 50 things about the UCL | ESPNSTAR.com
  11. ^ Global Gunners set for place in history
  12. ^ http://www.fcbayern.de/en/matches/match-reports/2014/match-report-190214-arsenal-fc-bayern-munich-champions-league-round-of-16-first-leg.php
  13. ^ Champions League » All-time appearances » rank 1 - 50, worldfootball.net, 2 October 2014
  14. ^ Xavi matches Raúl's appearance record, UEFA.com, 17 September 2014
  15. ^ uefa.com - UEFA Champions League - News & Features - News specific
  16. ^ "Rooney's debut hat-trick against Fenerbahçe". BBC Sport. 28 September 2004. Retrieved 11 May 2007. 
  17. ^ "Ronaldo writes another Champions League story in Copenhagen". ESPN. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  18. ^ "The fastest goal in the UEFA Champions League". ECA. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  19. ^ "Arsenal 5–1 Shakhtar Donetsk". BBC News. 19 October 2010. 
  20. ^ uefa.com - UEFA Champions League - Competition facts
  21. ^ Hamilton, Fiona. "Jens Lehmann". The Times (London). 
  22. ^ Ask Norman: Roy's record and getting shirty - ESPN Soccernet
  23. ^ http://soccernet.espn.go.com/player/_/id/12641/michael-ballack?cc=4716

External links[edit]