European route E59

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E59 shield

E59
E59 as Austrian A2 motorway south of Vienna
Route information
Length: 680 km (420 mi)
Major junctions
North end: Prague
  Czech D1 motorway shield D1 near Jihlava
Austrian A4 motorway shield A4 in Vienna
Austrian A2 motorway shield A2 near Graz
Slovenian A1 motorway shield A1 near Maribor
South end: Croatian A3 motorway shield A3 near Zagreb
Location
Countries: Czech Republic, Austria, Slovenia, Croatia
Highway system

International E-road network

E58 E60

European route E 59 is a north-south Class-A intermediate European route. It begins in Prague, Czech Republic, passes through Vienna, Austria and Maribor, Slovenia, ending near Zagreb, Croatia. The total length of the route is 644 km (400 mi). The E59 largely consists of motorways but some sections are developed either as expressways or two-lane roads with at-grade intersections. The motorway sections are generally tolled through varying systems and rates. Individual segments of the E59 route are shared with several other European routes. Originally, the route extended through Bihać, Bosnia and Herzegovina to Split, Croatia.

Route description[edit]

A view of the motorway from a flyover, a variable traffic sign gantry is visible
Croatian A2 motorway, near the southern terminus of the E59

Route of the E59 starts in Prague, Czech Republic, and proceeds southeast along the D1 motorway towards Jihlava, where it leaves the motorway and turns south along the route 38, a regular road comprising at-grade intersections. The route passes near Moravské Budějovice and Znojmo.[1] It crosses from the Czech Republic to Austria between Chvalovice and Haugsdorf as it switches to Austrian B303 state road, representing another two-lane road with at-grade intersections. South of Hollabrunn, the E59 transfers to the S3 expressway until it reaches Stockerau and the A22 which carries the E59 east to Vienna. Within the city, the E59 turns south once again in Donaustadt, transferring to the A23 taking it to the southern outskirts of the city. There it proceeds further south along the A2 motorway taking the route past Wiener Neustadt to the city of Graz. Graz itself is bypassed by the motorway and the E59 switches there to the A9 motorway marking the final southbound leg of the E59 through Austria until it reaches Spielfeld/Šentilj border crossing to Slovenia.[2] South of the border crossing the E59 route follows the Slovenian A1 motorway to the south of Maribor where the E59 leaves the A1 route and joins the A4 towards Ptuj. At Draženci near Ptuj, the route defaults to route 9, another two-lane road comprising at-grade intersections, taking it to Gruškovje/Macelj border crossing to Croatia.[3] South of the border, the E59 follows Croatian A2 motorway running past Krapina to Zagreb. The E59 terminates at Jankomir interchange of the Zagreb bypass, where southbound E59 traffic defaults to the eastbound A3 motorway.[4] Originally the E59 extended further south past Zagreb, to Bihać, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Split at the Adriatic Sea coast, however, that segment of the route was subsequently transferred to the European route E71. Nonetheless, the E59 shares segments of the route with a number of other European routes.[5] A part of the E59 spanning Prague and Vienna corresponds to the Pan-European Corridor IV, and the segment spanning Graz and Zagreb corresponds to the Pan-European Corridor Xa.[6]

Toll[edit]

A view of the motorway from a flyover, showing two carriageways and access ramp to the left, with a noise barrier in the background.
Czech D1 motorway, near the northern terminus of the E59

Various sections of the E59 are tolled, using a range of toll collection systems. In Czech Republic, vehicles exceeding 3.5 tonnes (3.4 long tons; 3.9 short tons) using the D1 motorway are charged toll using an electronic toll collection (ETC) system, while other vehicles are required to have a vignette displayed.[1][7] The same applies to Austrian motorways.[8] Slovenia has a similar system in place, although vehicles exceeding the 3.5 tonnes (3.4 long tons; 3.9 short tons) weight limit are provided with a number of payment options.[9] The Croatian A2 is also a tolled motorway, using a ticket system. As of August 2011, the toll charged along the A2 route between various toll plazas at each motorway exit and two mainline toll plazas, varies depending on the length of route travelled and the vehicle classification in Croatia. The toll is payable in either Croatian kuna or euros and by major credit and debit cards. A prepaid toll collection system is also used.[10]

History[edit]

UNECE was formed in 1947, and their first major act to improve transportation was a joint UN declaration no. 1264, the Declaration on the Construction of Main International Traffic Arteries,[11] signed in Geneva on September 16, 1950, which defined the first E-road network. This declaration was amended several times before November 15, 1975, when it was replaced by the European Agreement on Main International Traffic Arteries or "AGR", which set up a route numbering system and improved standards for roads in the list. The AGR went through several changes, with the last one, as of 2011, in 2008.[12] Reorganization of the E-roads network of 1975 and 1983 redefined the E71 designation previously associated with HanoverBremenBremerhaven road and assigned it to Košice–Budapest–Zagreb route.[11][13] The same documents assigned the Zagreb–Bihać–Split section to the E59, as the E71 terminated in Zagreb at the time, however, the most recent revision of the E-network truncated the E59 in Zagreb, and transferred its former southern leg to the E71, shortening the E59 considerably.[12]

Concurrencies[edit]

Country km Route[1][2][3][4] Control
cities
Connecting
routes
[4][14]
Notes
Czech Republic 0-114 Czech D1 motorway shield D1 Prague
Jihlava
Czech route 1 shield R1
Czech route 19 shield 19
Czech route 34 shield 34
Northbound E59 traffic leaving the segment defaults to Brněnská Street in Prague. Southbound E59 traffic leaves the D1 motorway at exit 112A. This segment is concurrent with the E50 and the E65 routes.
The northernmost segment of the route.
114-209 Czech route 38 shield 38 Jihlava
Znojmo
Czech route 23 shield 23
Czech route 53 shield 53
Regular road with at-grade intersections.
Austria 209-234 Austrian route B303 shield B303 Haugsdorf
Hollabrunn
Austrian route B2 shield B2
Austrian route B40 shield B40
Regular road with at-grade intersections.
234-255 Austrian S3 expressway shield S3 Hollabrunn
Stockerau
Austrian route B4 shield B4 Expressway
255-285 Austrian A22 motorway shield A22 Stockerau
Vienna
Austrian S1 expressway shield S1
Austrian route B8 shield B8
Southbound E59 traffic leaving the segment switches from the A22 to the A23 at Kaisermühlen interchange
This segment is concurrent with the E49.
285-296 Austrian A23 motorway shield A23 Vienna Austrian A4 motorway shield A4 Northbound E59 traffic leaving the segment switches to the A22 at Kaisermühlen interchange.
Southbound E59 traffic leaving the segment switches to the A2 at Inzersdorf interchange.
296-481 Austrian A2 motorway shield A2 Vienna
Graz
Austrian A3 motorway shield A3
Austrian A21 motorway shield A21
Austrian S4 expressway shield S4
Austrian S6 expressway shield S6
Southbound E59 traffic leaving the segment transfers to the A9 at Graz-West interchange.
Northbound E59 traffic leaving the segment transfers to the A23 at Inzersdorf interchange.
A part of this segment, between Fürstenfeld and Graz is concurrent with the E66.
481-522 Austrian A9 motorway shield A9 Graz
Spielfeld
Austrian route B70 shield B70 Northbound E59 traffic leaves the A9 at Graz-West interchange.
This segment is concurrent with the E57.
Slovenia 522-548 Slovenian A1 motorway shield A1 Šentilj
Maribor
Slovenian A5 motorway shield A5 Southbound E59 leaves the A1 at Maribor jug interchange.
This segment is concurrent with the E57.
548-568 Slovenian A4 motorway shield A4 Maribor
Ptuj
Slovenian route 2 shield 2 Southbound E59 defaults to route 9.
568-583 Slovenian route 9 shield 9 Ptuj
Gruškovje
Regular road with at-grade intersections.
Croatia 583-644 Croatian A2 motorway shield A2 Macelj
Zagreb
Croatian A3 motorway shield A3
Croatian D225 road shield D205
Croatian D307 road shield D307
Southbound E59 traffic leaving the segment defaults to eastbound A3 (E70) at Jankomir interchange of the Zagreb bypass.
The southernmost segment of the route.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Roads and Motorways in the Czech Republic" (PDF). Road and Motorway Directorate of Czech Republic. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "STRASSENNETZ" [Road network] (in German). ASFINAG. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Zgrajene AC, HC ter druge javne ceste v okviru NPIA" [Completed motorways, expressways and other public roads within the National Motorway Construction Programme] (in Slovenian). DARS. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c "Regulation on motorway markings, chainage, interchange/exit/rest area numbers and names". Narodne novine (in Croatian). April 24, 2003. 
  5. ^ "European Agreement on main international traffic arteries (AGR) (with annexes and list of roads). Concluded at Geneva on 15 November 1975" (PDF). United Nations. Retrieved July 29, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Introducing TEM and TER". United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Stickers (< 3.5 t)". ceskedalnice.cz. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  8. ^ "TOLL". ASFINAG. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  9. ^ "TOLL". DARS. Retrieved August 1, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Zagreb - Macelj pricelist". Hrvatske autoceste. Retrieved July 24, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b "Declaration on the Construction of Main International Traffic Arteries, signed at Geneva". United Nations. September 16, 1950. Retrieved August 10, 2011. 
  12. ^ a b "EUROPEAN AGREMENT ON MAIN INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC ARTERIES (AGR)" (PDF). United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. March 28, 2008. Retrieved August 8, 2011. 
  13. ^ "European Agreement on main international traffic arteries (AGR) (with annexes and list of roads). Concluded at Geneva on 15 November 1975" (PDF). United Nations. Retrieved August 29, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Decision on categorization of public roads as state roads, county roads and local roads". Narodne novine (in Croatian). February 17, 2010.